Local Reviews: Kid Madusa

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Kid Madusa
Street: 06.08
Kid Madusa = Ulver + Bat for Lashes + Dresden Dolls
Enter the dark, raw, silky mysticism of the parallel universe that is Kid Madusa. This album, Kid Madusa’s first, begins with a haunting, harpsicord waterfall and rich doubled vocals that seem to hold the sorrow and wisdom of 200 years, not the 27 of Lindsay Heath, exdrummer of Phono and The Tremula and current drummer of Bronwyn Beecher and Twin Lull. Lindsay’s trademark heavy, unpredictable drumming serves the album well, especially in the trippy beats of “The Baderie Acid Recovery Project.” Lindsay plays most of the instruments on the album, with Cache Tolman (Rival Schools, Skullfuzz) on bass and James Miska lending trumpet. Lindsay’s distinct songwriting is a cross between funeral dirges for dollhouse families and a David Lynch circus. “Marry Anette” is a deathly waltz on a tightrope 1,000 feet above a craning, anonymous crowd, and the unusual drumbeat switch-up near the end is precise and unique like a Black Forest clock. “Vanishing Twins,” “Twilight Antique” and “Xis Ytxis” are atmospheric, dreamy soundscapes. “Weeping Cathedral” starts with a samba beat, minimal, floaty keys and hypnotic melodies until bursting into a chorus that expands outward like the sea at high tide. Kid Madusa taps into the despair that is inherent to the human condition, with a sensitivity that offers a beautiful respite. This is some of the best local songwriting you will ever hear.