Enemy of the Sun: A new breed of thrash, interview with Waldemar Sorychta

Posted April 9, 2008 in
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It is with excitement and enjoyment that musical virtuoso Waldemar Sorychta, a key member in the seminal thrash band Grip Inc. that also featured Dave Lombardo (Slayer) on drums, has a distinctly new band which he has the highest hopes for. Those hopes do not go without a basis to found them on. The band’s debut Shadows from The End Records is a mixed assault of thrash and progressive metal. While Grip Inc. was broken up, Waldemar has offered up his talents to the likes of Samael, Lacuna Coil, and most recently the gothic metal excursion Eyes of Eden, which included the drummer from H.I.M. Talking to Waldemar, it was easy to see his anticipation and utter enjoyment with the process of the new album and its return to the thrash metal realm.


Enemy of the Sun

“It’s been a few years since my last record was released worldwide. I want to say it’s a very emotional thing for me, its passion,” told Sorychta in a phone interview with SLUG. “When you do a record without any passion and you will find out very soon that there is no life behind it. This is something that you’ll never find with Enemy of the Sun. If you hear the name you will always find passion and some good heavy metal.”

To diverse metal fans the name of the band might ring a few bells, from the landmark Neurosis album of the same name. The decision to name the band such was no coincidence. “In fact it comes from Neurosis. In 1993 when Enemy of the Sun came out I liked the name very much. It doesn’t sound negative to me. It’s a different way of spelling darkness, to see it from the different side,” says Waldemar.

“You need sun to see shadows. The same as our logo, sun and skull, a symbol of life and death melting together. One can exist without the other.”

Although Waldemar is one of the primary songwriters on the record he doesn’t exclude any praise from other members and insists the band is a collaboration, not just his ideas.

“I want the people in the band to reflect themselves in the music, so they have the feeling that they are not just musicians in this band. In the outside, people call this the new Waldemar band, but to us everyone has to be a part of this band. With the singer, it is important that he can sing much more with his feeling when he sings with his own lyrics,” explains Waldemar.

Ultimately, Waldemar describes Enemy of the Sun in the way that only he could.

“Most of the songs talk about the darker side of humanity. Music like this all has an optimistic view. We don’t like to point at things or judge about things. It is important to me to not use any religion or nationalities. It’s for me about the problems that humans have. It doesn’t matter where they live, humans always have the same problems. They have good and bad sides. We mainly think that is what makes the human turn to the dark side.”