Keeping it real with the Deftones: A phone interview about “lettin’ em’ know” with Deftones DJ Frank Delgado

Posted August 2, 2007 in
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Deftones one of the hardest working, longest lasting, most innovative and original bands around, they began in 1988 as childhood friends in Sacramento, Calif. In 1995 they released their first record, Adrenaline. In the 12 years since, they have released four other records, all growing and progressing musically more than the other. There most recent release their fifth studio album Saturday Night Wrist was a difficult one for the band to write. Choosing to not go with long-time producer Terry Date, the band went through a slew of possible producer such as Ken Andrews of Failure, Ric Ocasek of The Cars and Dan the Automator. The band finally settled on former Pink Floyd producer Bob Ezrin. Working with Ezrin didn’t go as well as the band had hoped and a couple months later the recording sessions ended. In the early part of 2006 the band began recording again finally finishing the record with producer Shawn Lopez former guitar player of Far and current member of The Revolution Smile.


Deftones (courtesy of myspace.com/deftones)

I got a chance to talk with Frank Delgado a few days before the North American tour began while the band was on a three-week break from touring. I had to get the stone skinny about what’s been going on with his band and all the recent drama surrounding them.

SLUG: What were the problems that caused the delay of the record? Was it that Chino (Moreno vocals) left to do Team Sleep or that Stephen (Carpenter guitar) was obsessed with online golf… What was the hold up?
FD: It was all of that. We probably went in too early to record. A bunch of shit happened, it was just life. We didn’t want to try and force creativity… you can always chalk it up to the fact there’s this pain that you have to go through to make a record. You can’t just give in and be like, 'okay here will put out a record it sucks, but here….' You have to stick with it and that’s what we did.

SLUG: Why didn’t you work with Terry Date on Saturday Night Wrist?
FD: We were trying new things, just wanted a change. We would have probably, but why not take a chance try something different get out of our comfort zone?

SLUG: You guys started working with Dan the Automator, what happened with that?
FD: We were writing at a house in Southern California and he came through and started hanging out. It was really relaxed. We made noise, but while he was hanging we were still meeting new people and we just decide to go with Bob Ezrin, someone who we thought would take us for a different loop.

SLUG: Why didn’t the band get along with Ezrin?
FD: It wasn’t so much that we didn’t get along with him. The working relationship was something we weren’t used to. Some people expected something and maybe got another and others didn’t. It’s hard to gel and record with someone you just met. When the deadlines come and shit ain’t happening we couldn’t expect Bob Ezrin to wait around for us, and maybe some guys in the band weren’t getting what they wanted out of the relationship. He stuck around a lot longer than he was scheduled to. But, I’m glad we did it the record still turned out really good.

SLUG: What kind of music are you guys into?
FD: We try to stay knee deep in all genres. The glue amongst all of us is music; we’re in to all kinds of music. Like Stephen who can go from heavy shit then to someone like Depeche Mode and he can appreciate it just the same. When you finally get to an age you realize that you just like music… the argument where people say there’s no good music out there is the biggest heap I’ve ever heard. Go out and listen to local bands, go find something you like. There’s always something new and exciting out there, just don’t let it be forced on you by the radio or what your friends listen to. Go hang out in record stores go support local shows.

SLUG: Who writes the music?
FD: It’s just all of us making noise and jamming, it’s different from time to time. There’s no formula on how to do it, because if there was a formula we’d write songs much faster.

SLUG: How do you think the bands sound is going to progress?
FD: That’s the hard thing about being in a band is trying to take all those influences and trying to make something original out of it, I think we’re getting good at it. I think we all have our favorite music. It’s all in the way you execute it, doing it in a way where it becomes yours and I think we’re getting pretty good at that. I don’t know, it’s hard to say. I guess we’ll just see where it goes.

SLUG: What are the future plans for the Deftones?
FD: We are doing a huge North American tour, going through the states then up to Canada back to Europe for the festivals then probably down to Southern America and then probably back up to the states… traveling the world.

SLUG: How do you decide to take on tour with you?
FD: It just depends on who’s available at the time and who’s willing to go out and work. We always take the route where we’ll play with anyone, we don’t really feel like were elitist to anything. We’ve gone out with everyone from with indie old school bands like Quicksand or more metal popular bands like Godsmack or someone whose newer like Denali.

SLUG: Which songs do you choose to play live since you have such a wide variety of musical moods to choose from?
FD: We usually write the set list last minute. We always try to incorporate all the records. It’s nice to have a dynamic set of songs to choose from… like one big mix tape.

SLUG: Would it be a problem if Chino went and did another Team Sleep record again?
FD: No. All the guys in Team Sleep are our friends. Crook (DJ for Team Sleep) Todd (Wilkinson, guitar player for Team Sleep), those guys are some of our best friends. There’s no animosity from Chino doing Team Sleep--it was just the timing that he did it.

Deftones seem once again ready to take over the world after talking with Frank and having him put all my worries about the band to rest. Judging by the pair of crazy pimp-smackin’ shows they just recently played at the Salt Palace Convention Center on June 23 and 24, the Deftones are healthier than ever. If you didn’t go to either show, you are a fool and you missed out on the most intense and captivating live band of all time.

Keeping it real with the Deftones: A phone interview about “lettin’ em’ know” with Deftones DJ Frank Delgado

Posted August 2, 2007 in
Share this:Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+0Pin on Pinterest0
Deftones one of the hardest working, longest lasting, most innovative and original bands around, they began in 1988 as childhood friends in Sacramento, Calif. In 1995 they released their first record, Adrenaline. In the 12 years since, they have released four other records, all growing and progressing musically more than the other. There most recent release their fifth studio album Saturday Night Wrist was a difficult one for the band to write. Choosing to not go with long-time producer Terry Date, the band went through a slew of possible producer such as Ken Andrews of Failure, Ric Ocasek of The Cars and Dan the Automator. The band finally settled on former Pink Floyd producer Bob Ezrin. Working with Ezrin didn’t go as well as the band had hoped and a couple months later the recording sessions ended. In the early part of 2006 the band began recording again finally finishing the record with producer Shawn Lopez former guitar player of Far and current member of The Revolution Smile.


Deftones (courtesy of myspace.com/deftones)

I got a chance to talk with Frank Delgado a few days before the North American tour began while the band was on a three-week break from touring. I had to get the stone skinny about what’s been going on with his band and all the recent drama surrounding them.

SLUG: What were the problems that caused the delay of the record? Was it that Chino (Moreno vocals) left to do Team Sleep or that Stephen (Carpenter guitar) was obsessed with online golf… What was the hold up?
FD: It was all of that. We probably went in too early to record. A bunch of shit happened, it was just life. We didn’t want to try and force creativity… you can always chalk it up to the fact there’s this pain that you have to go through to make a record. You can’t just give in and be like, 'okay here will put out a record it sucks, but here….' You have to stick with it and that’s what we did.

SLUG: Why didn’t you work with Terry Date on Saturday Night Wrist?
FD: We were trying new things, just wanted a change. We would have probably, but why not take a chance try something different get out of our comfort zone?

SLUG: You guys started working with Dan the Automator, what happened with that?
FD: We were writing at a house in Southern California and he came through and started hanging out. It was really relaxed. We made noise, but while he was hanging we were still meeting new people and we just decide to go with Bob Ezrin, someone who we thought would take us for a different loop.

SLUG: Why didn’t the band get along with Ezrin?
FD: It wasn’t so much that we didn’t get along with him. The working relationship was something we weren’t used to. Some people expected something and maybe got another and others didn’t. It’s hard to gel and record with someone you just met. When the deadlines come and shit ain’t happening we couldn’t expect Bob Ezrin to wait around for us, and maybe some guys in the band weren’t getting what they wanted out of the relationship. He stuck around a lot longer than he was scheduled to. But, I’m glad we did it the record still turned out really good.

SLUG: What kind of music are you guys into?
FD: We try to stay knee deep in all genres. The glue amongst all of us is music; we’re in to all kinds of music. Like Stephen who can go from heavy shit then to someone like Depeche Mode and he can appreciate it just the same. When you finally get to an age you realize that you just like music… the argument where people say there’s no good music out there is the biggest heap I’ve ever heard. Go out and listen to local bands, go find something you like. There’s always something new and exciting out there, just don’t let it be forced on you by the radio or what your friends listen to. Go hang out in record stores go support local shows.

SLUG: Who writes the music?
FD: It’s just all of us making noise and jamming, it’s different from time to time. There’s no formula on how to do it, because if there was a formula we’d write songs much faster.

SLUG: How do you think the bands sound is going to progress?
FD: That’s the hard thing about being in a band is trying to take all those influences and trying to make something original out of it, I think we’re getting good at it. I think we all have our favorite music. It’s all in the way you execute it, doing it in a way where it becomes yours and I think we’re getting pretty good at that. I don’t know, it’s hard to say. I guess we’ll just see where it goes.

SLUG: What are the future plans for the Deftones?
FD: We are doing a huge North American tour, going through the states then up to Canada back to Europe for the festivals then probably down to Southern America and then probably back up to the states… traveling the world.

SLUG: How do you decide to take on tour with you?
FD: It just depends on who’s available at the time and who’s willing to go out and work. We always take the route where we’ll play with anyone, we don’t really feel like were elitist to anything. We’ve gone out with everyone from with indie old school bands like Quicksand or more metal popular bands like Godsmack or someone whose newer like Denali.

SLUG: Which songs do you choose to play live since you have such a wide variety of musical moods to choose from?
FD: We usually write the set list last minute. We always try to incorporate all the records. It’s nice to have a dynamic set of songs to choose from… like one big mix tape.

SLUG: Would it be a problem if Chino went and did another Team Sleep record again?
FD: No. All the guys in Team Sleep are our friends. Crook (DJ for Team Sleep) Todd (Wilkinson, guitar player for Team Sleep), those guys are some of our best friends. There’s no animosity from Chino doing Team Sleep--it was just the timing that he did it.

Deftones seem once again ready to take over the world after talking with Frank and having him put all my worries about the band to rest. Judging by the pair of crazy pimp-smackin’ shows they just recently played at the Salt Palace Convention Center on June 23 and 24, the Deftones are healthier than ever. If you didn’t go to either show, you are a fool and you missed out on the most intense and captivating live band of all time.