Perfect Pussy @ Kilby Court 05.20 With Potty Mouth, Fossil Arms

Posted May 23, 2014 in
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Abby Weems of Potty Mouth doing her best Courtney Love impression. Photo: Camille Evans
“Whoa dude, did you see that?” I hadn’t been to a show at Kilby Court in a while, and this is what I hear from the handful of fashionable high school kids in reaction to local goth cuties Fossil Arms, as if they’ve dropped down secretly from the grey skies of some distant British storm cell. Fossil Arms deserve such eager amazement, especially tonight, as the duo’s set captivated from the get-go. The crowd, interspersed with high schoolers and punk friends, came out early and filled Kilby’s garage-length space quite nicely by the time Fossil Arms were ready to start the evening.
 
Backed by Melody Maglione’s steady, manic synth and drum programming and masked by a bouquet of silk roses, Chaz Costello crooned Fossil Arms’ post-punk ceremony into the responsive audience. Costello’s signature vocal masking seemed to grow more alienating as the songs progressed—their anti-anthem “Time For Words” was exceptionally well performed. The overall effect of the set made for one of the most direct—and thus emotionally captivating—shows that I’ve seen yet from the two. Though it wasn’t necessarily a goth riot, the energy stirring about the young-ish audience was exciting to watch, and even more exciting to see carry on throughout the night.
 
Next up: Potty Mouth, hailing from Massachusetts’ Pioneer Valley (birthplace to Sonic Youth and Dinosaur Jr.) and touring with the likes of Perfect Pussy, Swearin’ and Waxahatchee.
The all-girl quartet lived up to the Northampton hype and delivered fuzzy, grunge-flavored guitar pop with songs from their debut LP, Hell Bent. Singer Abby Weems did a pretty good Courtney Love impression through most of their set, minus the raspy voice. Their tunes were a great pop foil to the punk noise to come and the audience was hoppin’ around to their sugary sweet melodies. On their last song, guitarist Ally grabbed the mic for a sweet and campy intro to their slow-burning album closer “The Better End.”