Review: The Conjuring 2

Posted November 3, 2016 in
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The Conjuring 2

Director: James Wan
Warner Bros.
Street: 09.13

I’m not the biggest fan of jump-scares and shrieking violins that are only put into a movie to make you lose your shit—and yet I still find myself always on the search for a great scary movie. For a few years now, I’ve been invested in the Ed and Lorraine Warren franchise, beginning with The Conjuring (2013) and then Annabelle (2014). The Conjuring 2 was just as predictable and entertaining as I imagined.

Based on a “true story,” The Conjuring 2 once again follows demonologists Ed and Lorraine Warren—this time to the Hodgson family in London, where Janet, the youngest daughter, is showing symptoms of possession. The house is stereotypically old, starting with the burnt-looking corner in the front room and the chair that hasn’t moved from that spot for decades. What did shock me was how quickly the police responded and believed the family that some weird activity was going on. Ed and Lorraine decide to work on the case and must prove that the little girl is possessed before the Catholic Church will get involved. While different parties are debating whether the family is faking scenes, Janet—or, perhaps, the spirit that possesses her—wreaks havoc on her family. In the midst of monsters that remind me of The Nightmare Before Christmas—and a grotesque, persistent, maniacal nun—is a story about family and how difficult it can be to keep family together.

Through another slew of predictable scenes and an anti-climactic ending, I did find myself invested in some of these characters. And even with the combination of unrealistic monsters and cheesy-looking paranormal activity, I enjoyed finding things here and there that are directly linked to the other Ed and Lorraine Warren movies—such as the Annabelle doll itself. So, did I find a “great scary movie?” I would say that overall, it’s fairly entertaining and worth giving a chance if you’ve already invested yourself in the multiple-film story line. –Alex Vermillion