Let Them Eat Cupcakes

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So many of my customers live [in Salt Lake]it only made sense to expand into the valley. Photo: Katie Panzer

Brownies ... Cupcakes ... Eclairs ... Cream-filled sponge-cake delicacies dubbed ‘Dillos’… Gazing into the glass display case reveals the things dreams are made of, but I bet you wouldn’t guess that you are in a vegan and specialty bakery. That is, you wouldn’t if owner and mastermind Kelly Green didn’t already go through every effort to make sure you know exactly what you are looking at when you peruse the handmade treats at Cakewalk. Each item has a checklist on a small card next to it, neatly clarifying which items contain what, including common allergens like soy and gluten.

“Having been vegan since I was 12, I had to learn how to cook and bake so that I could still eat the things that I love,” Green says. “And raising my son vegan, I never want him to feel like he is missing out on anything.” This desire led to Green’s creation of the vegan eclair, one of her personal favorites, the Dillos, which replace other, non-vegan cream-filled sponge cakes you may be aware of and anything else previously thought lost forever when one ventures into the vegan lifestyle. 

The hobby went live in 2007 when her special-needs dog, rescued from the hard life on the streets of downtown, presented her with some extra costs in medical expenses. She decided to sell her homemade vegan treats to her friends for extra cash, and when the demand grew, there was really only one thing to do.

Green opened up a shop in Woods Cross first, but when the demand grew stronger still, the call to Salt Lake was too much to ignore. Earlier this year, the second Cakewalk location opened downtown. “So many of my customers live [in Salt Lake]—it only made sense to expand into the valley,” Green says.

With nothing short of world-domination on the agenda, Green aims to get her Dillos in stores nationwide and into the happy hands of conscientious consumers everywhere. She is currently in the process of figuring out her packaging and marketing plan. Considering that she’s accomplished all this in three short years while raising her son as a single mother, training as a triathlete and championing against animal cruelty, I think Salt Lake is lucky to have her.

You will enjoy Cakewalk’s freshly handmade desserts even if you aren’t a picky eater—they definitely rival the selection you’ll find getting stale on your grocer’s shelves, whether you are vegan or not. Now you can pick them up at two Cakewalk locations, 566 W. 1350 S. in Woods Cross and Downtown at 434 S. 900 E., as well as at several other delightful local establishments, including Sugarhouse Coffee, Rising Sun and Nobrow.

Pumpkin Spice Bread Recipe
provided by Kelly Green


1 (15 ounce) can pumpkin puree 1 tbs “Instead of Eggs” mix
(Can be purchased at Cakewalk) 2 tbs flax seeds 1/2 C. water whip 3/4 C. oil
1/4 C. unsweetened apple sauce 2/3 cup water 1 C. brown sugar 2 C. white sugar
3 1/2 cups all-purpose unbleached flour 2 teaspoons baking soda 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger 1 tsp. vanilla


1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
2. Grease and flour three 7X3 inch loaf pans.
3. Sift flour, baking soda and salt together and set aside.
4. In a large bowl or stand mixer, quickly whisk together flax seeds, “Instead of Eggs” mix and 1/2 cup of water until frothy and gooey. Add oil, applesauce and whisk until ingredients are well combined.
5. Add 2/3 cup of water, brown sugar, white sugar, spices and vanilla until well combined. Add pumpkin and whip for 1 minute.
6. Add in flour mix and any other additives (walnuts, chocolate chips, etc.) gently until just combined.
7. Pour into loaf pans and bake for about 55 minutes (times may vary) or until a toothpick comes out clean.
8. Let pans cool before removing bread. Wrap or store in airtight container.

So many of my customers live [in Salt Lake]it only made sense to expand into the valley. Photo: Katie Panzer