Diamond in the Ruff

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photo: Chris Swainston

There aren’t many things in this city that get me to venture past the greater down town area, until now. Nestled away in the corner of Rose Park on 1200w. and 1300n. is Salt Lake valley’s newest edition to the ever growing community of concrete parks. This place is a gem, to say the least. It may not be the biggest park in the valley, comparable in size to South Jordan Park, but every last square inch of this park has been utilized to perfection. It holds together a great balance of flow between 60 percent street obstacles and 40 percent tranny and banks. I might go as far to say that this place is Salt Lake’s most fun skate park to date, but before I could lay claim to such a bold statement the park had to be put the test. What better way then a beautiful, leisurely Sunday afternoon?


photo: Chris Swainston

The test monkeys were Dave Van, Randy Riddle, Mike Murdock, Isaiah Beh, Adam Dorobiala and myself. We all met up at the park around 10:30am. The park was virtually ours, only a handful of little groms were rolling around this early. As soon as I threw my board down the endless fun possibilities this park has to offer became obvious. The park maintains a fairly symmetrical design through out, which is great, and allowed me to have equal amounts of fun frontside and backside. Starting at the western most end of the park are two C ledges tucked into both corners, for the most part these ledges are used as a bench and place to put shit. From there is an ideal flat ledge/manual pad, which is the perfect height, it’s just the right length and has a C curve to one side. Moving east, from the outside edges in are two identical hubbas and trainer handrails that split a set of stairs to one side and bank on the other. In the center lies the parks best feature a mini quarter pipe. Seriously, who doesn’t love mini tranny? There were smiles all day long skating this thing, I felt like Dan Drehobl by the time I left. The tranny extends out past the stairs giving you the option to skate from the shallow end to the deep end or visa versa. Did I mention it has a concrete edge instead of metal coping? From there it’s a tabletop hop with a ledge on top and a hip-hop or euro gap on the other side of the park. The eastern most end of the park has an S curved quarterpipe wall about six feet tall with an absolute perfect tranny.


photo: Isaiah Beh

As the day wore on the park started getting crowded. However, there is so much open space that I rarely got in anyone’s way, not to mention that at any given time there seemed to be more kids sitting down then skating. We had some seriously fun sessions on just about every piece of the park. Murdock threw down some skillful ninja 3-flips that even the Karate Kid would have run from. Backing him up with some zig zagger indy grabs was Mr. Adam Dorobiala. Watch out when you see that board slashing your way, that pointy tip will cut you up. Riddle me this, Randy put the bump to ledge in its place with a solid back smith, while Dave popped and stomped his day away with some lofty nollie heels. Don’t forget about Isaiah Beh, mini tranny king—he ripped apart that oh so lucious mini quarter-pipe island. I popped in to snap a quick pic mid back tail revert.


photo: Chris Swainston

The only bad thing I can say about this park is the dusty ground—hardly something to complain about. If you haven’t skated this park by the time you read this article then you are most defiantly missing out. Hurry up, grab you board and go skate Rose Park, hopefully there’s not a foot of snow on the ground.


photo: Chris Swainston