The Speedway Project: The History Within the Walls of SLC’s Legendary Underground Venue

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Photo: Trent Nelson

From 1986 to 1990, The Speedway Café was a magnet for underground music, housing both local and touring acts in a space that contributed heavily to the growth of SLC’s alternative community. After Speedway closed its doors 25 years ago, it left behind an imprint of something that a city like SLC needed in that time—an all-you-can-eat musical buffet that a starving, growing underground scene had been longing for previously. Documentarian Trinity West has set out to gather as many stories, fliers, ticket stubs, pictures and footage from anyone who was part of the venue’s history to make what will be both a documentary film and book.

Trinity West is spearheading ​The Speedway Project book and film. Photo: Justin Wambolt-Reynolds

While West hadn’t attended any Speedway shows due to her living in Price, Utah, for most of her childhood, she would hear about them from her brother, who went to shows religiously and would have their mother drive them to Raunch Records to obtain fliers as souvenirs. West says that it bonded her family in a weird way, and with this project, Speedway is still very much a family affair. “My mom watches my two boys while I’ve been researching and conducting interviews during our trips to SLC; my brother and little cousin have been working with me, and my husband, Justin Wambolt-Reynolds, is art directing everything with me as well as designing the ad,” says West. After going through some old fliers and discovering beautiful images of some fundamental bands taken by photographers Steve Midgley and Trent Nelson and hearing different stories about the venue, West realized that Speedway had a unique story to be told. She garnered moral support from SLUG Magazine Editor Angela Brown, Speedway owner Paul Maritsas and Brad Collins of Raunch Records. After mapping out her approach and the timeline, the project went public in November 2015.

West conceived of the book as a collective journal, compiling multiple perspectives to make it as authentic as possible. “That’s why I’m asking for any memorabilia or even written accounts and interviews,” she says. “It’s essential to have it told in each person’s own words.” The list of contributors includes local bands such as The Stench, Bad Yodelers, Insight, Boxcar Kids, Iceburn and Massacre Guys, who, prior to Speedway, didn’t have a venue to play in; national acts such as Soundgarden and Social Distortion, who became house bands from playing there so many times; and bands who played standout shows such as Ministry, who played to a crowd that was double the venue’s capacity.

The idea for a documentary didn’t come to fruition until Maritsas suggested to West that she film him opening his boxes of Speedway memorabilia for the first time since it closed. “My background is not in film,” West says, “but as I was filming him going over the fliers of all the different bands, my mind was blown. That’s when I realized that there was a film here.” The film will focus on the underground scene of the Speedway colliding with the backdrop of SLC’s religious conservatism during the Ronald Reagan presidency. Since not enough video footage of Speedway exists, West reached out to Pushead—illustrator of Zorlac Skateboards and Raunch Records’ logo—to design illustrations for what will be animated portrayals of what went on behind the walls of the venue. “It gives the film some texture and more of a style, and when you don’t have enough material, you have to get creative,” says West. “The images and illustrations will give a sense of what it was like to be in the pit.”

The Stench at The Speedway Café. Photo: Rick Egan

Speedway first opened in 1984—cultivated as a local space for underground music, its catchphrase was “a café that served no food and had a bar that didn’t serve booze.” “There was a ground swell of musicians who were finding their community through it,” says West. When a band would be booked, local bands were always put on the bill since they had a bigger draw than the headliner. There were no musical limitations either—genres ranged from punk, metal, glam, rap and reggae. Maritsas would pitch to touring bands that they had an audience in SLC, which is the only major city between Reno and Denver. While there were a few other venues that accommodated the local scene, Speedway was the proverbial Mecca, just spitting distance from Raunch Records where people could congregate and discover new music.

Due to a lack of funding, Speedway officially closed its doors in 1990. West explains that Maritsas had a day job to support the venue, and Speedway was lucky to break even most nights. The venue was gone, but the community and the bands had gotten bigger—The Speedway Café became Speedway Productions and began to book them at bigger venues. Speedway was just one of the seeds that kept the scene thriving—SLUG Magazine, which was conceived within the walls of Speedway, became the resource for the scene to find out about different shows. Most shows would be played at venues like DV8 or the Zephyr but didn’t always cater to the underground demographic.

Each generation may have had their own version of it, but Speedway was a trailblazing institution that is still held in the highest light. West reestablishes that the purpose of this project is to capture and preserve the memories for future generations who have a flare for the history of underground music. With her up-close-and-personal approach, people will hear from firsthand accounts why Speedway Café is a countercultural treasure. To share your Speedway Café narrative, email West at trinity@speedwayproject.com.

  • hesthewiz

    I was at the Ministry show, the crazy show I have ever attended. There was a chain linked fence across the stage. The band came out and the lead singer said “fuck you” and spit into the crowd…everyone spat back in a hail of spit fire. It was disgusting and insane. At one point the lead singer said “are you going to hang on the fence like monkeys (people were climbing the fence and there were roadies smacking at peoples hands with clubs to knock them off) or are you going to tear the fucking thing down”. No one tore it down, that was one strong fence 🙂

    • Trinity West

      This show has become legendary, I would love to hear more about your personal experience! Please email me at trinity@speedwayproject.com, I hope to work with you. Thanks!

  • UtahSamuel

    Steve Hatch and I went to see Faith No More in 1989. Some guy kept stage diving feetfirst and when the bouncers finally caught him Mike Patton, while singing and without missing a beat, made his way over to where they were dragging the guy off the stage and punched him in the face. Mike also was laying flat on his back for a few songs and his horizontal set included The Nestlé alpine white song. I remember standing right in front of Jim Martin and letting his Marshall amplifier blast me in the face, fueling my angsty teenage guitar playing and contributing to my tinitus. That was a great venue and I remember how bummed out we all were when I was shutdown that next year.

    • Trinity West

      This story is awesome! I’d love to hear more. Please email me at trinity@speedwayproject.com, I hope to hear from you. Thanks!

  • Spencer Jacobs

    i think i’m in that photo.

    • Trinity West

      ha! Is that true?

      • Spencer Jacobs

        yeah, i think so. front of stage on the left side of the photo, looking back at the pit—just behind that large funny looking skinhead.

  • Ihavenouseforaname

    One of the craziest memories I have of the speedway, was when some dudes that came with Christ on Parade jumped onto the moving freight train and just rode off away to wherever that took them. I am so surprised that someone at some point didn’t get run over by the train at a gig.

    • Trinity West

      I would love to get my hands on any/all materials you have! Please email me at trinity@speedwayproject.com, I’m excited your collection. Thanks!

  • Ihavenouseforaname

    It was actually still called Studio 505 when Christ on Parade played though. I still have the flyer. And a shit ton of other speedway flyers too.
    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=107339479280693&l=5c01b57469

  • salticid

    It’s rather fortuitous I found this article. Every couple of years or so I run a search on the Speedway, just to see if there’s been any talk about it. I basically say that I was raised in a mosh pit. I considered the Speedway my home in its early days. I got into every show free & went to almost every show for a few years. Thanks to the kind bouncer I befriended, James. 😉 Although I didn’t have a lot of interactions with Paul Maritsas, he was always a total sweetheart.

    One thing that was really obnoxious about the crowds is that some guys felt that they could grab my girl parts (this wasn’t unique to the Speedway in any way…), and sorry, but if you grab – I will make it PAINFUL! I snapped fingers left & right and had lightening fast reflexes. But one gig when I was up front, I couldn’t capture the assaulting hands. I looked behind me & every time this guy shook his head in protestation. How the hell did he know why I was looking back? That’s it! I punched him squarely in the nose & am pretty sure I broke it. And then, the molestation stopped! Problem solved! I thought. But after the show the guy came to me with Paul. And he asked if I punched the guy. I told him yes and why. The only thing that came of it, is that come to find out. I punched the WRONG guy! Oh did I feel bad! But he saw what the dude was doing, that’s why he was trying to say it wasn’t himself. And I informed him that he either should’ve pointed the perp out or done something to stop him BUT don’t just sit there & watch! Sheesh!

    But for the most part, the kids at the shows were completely nonviolent. The pit was incredibly peaceful and FUN as hell! I weighed like almost nothing (80 pounds max) and I was constantly FLYING ! The guys didn’t stop moshing at all, just cuz there was a girl in the pit. And that’s the way it should be! As the years went on, more girls would enter and it SUCKED! Cuz it basically brought the pit to a standstill. And that actually makes the pit more dangerous. At least for me, cuz I need speed and momentum to bounce off the hits. When it is slow, the hits stick. Anyway, as those in the pit know, if someone goes to the ground, you pick ’em up! No one wanted to hurt anybody and it wasn’t a testosterone fueled display ground either. It was just pure damn fun! Sadly, pits evolved into a hunting and/or proving ground for dudes like 10-15 years later. But the beauty of a pit is that you can get ’em to form almost spontaneously. Just push enough people around and direct them in a circle and there ya go! And you can eject the bad seeds and keep ’em out and create the kinda pit where it is pure and fun and nonviolent. Cuz that’s what most people want! Well, that was true for a long time. I now unfortunately live in a small town that will toss you out if you push people! What cretins!

    Oh and I’d love to go on about stage diving and crowd surfing. God do I LOVE that! It’s a different form of flying than in well constructed pits. But the last time I was in a crowd surfing friendly environment was 2001 in Boulder, CO. The urge to do so at punk shows is just so overwhelming! The Speedway was magical and free and open and a freakin’ blast! But I quickly learned how to avoid bouncers at other venues – just don’t let the crowd send you toward the stage. I don’t know why people insist on that direction, but surfing upstream has its own rewards! 😉 And if by chance a bouncer infiltrates the crowd and tries to bounce, they just aren’t equipped to catch. They are too slow and lumbering. And there’s nothing more damaging to those bullies, than having a girl about a third of their size render them incompetent at their job. And a lot of bouncers are just that – bullies. Which in contrast makes the Speedway even more of a utopia, cuz as I said, James the bouncer was a very kind man! No place like it – that I have encountered since. And I’ve definitely covered a lot of ground over the years. Punk to me was no phase, it’s who I *am* – both then and today!

    Okay, I’ll shut up now. I just kinda rambled here, but I’ll likely cobble together a piece & submit to Trinity. It’s awesome she’s doing a doc! 😉

    I’ll also say that it is surprising there’s so little video footage. I remember dozens and dozens of shows that were filmed. But I think that was almost all band footage and I’ve no memories of which shows those were! Oh and as far as favorite shows go? I’d have to give that to the Circle Jerks. It was a combo of them and the crowd that was just electrifying and bodies FLYING everywhere! SO many bodies in the air! And although it was at DV8 more than a decade later, the cutest dang thing were a bunch of 12 and 13 year old kids who came to see the Jerks and they surrounded me with reverence as I talked about the good ole days. It just made my heart swell to see the next gen all gung ho. That may or may not have been the show where it was ok to stage dive six times, but the seventh was just one time too many. WTF? I was tossed without warning (oh it took the collective efforts of 3 or 4 to finally boot me cuz I kept escaping their grasp!). And then I’m out of the club and some guy comes running toward me saying the Jerks stopped the show and were demanding that I be let back in! Hell yeah! But not so fast – the club wouldn’t let me back in! And so i’m just sitting on the sidewalk and then BAM! The cops show up and slam me down HARD and cuff me for no damn reason! And then I’m tossed into jail. And charged with trespassing. WTF? On a public sidewalk? BS! That was straight up retaliation by the bouncers which sadly, they are wont to do cuz of the ego bruising I deal. Some cops will bounce part time, so it can be a nasty cocktail for doing no damn harm to no one, but just going out and having a fun time! Again, sorry for the ramble, but this adds perspective to just how mighty special the Speedway really was!

    • Kristen Hogan

      This is Kristen from the last year of the Speedway…I ran Kiddie bar. I think I remember you. Look me up I’m Kristen Hogan on FB, in PA. I’d love to chat!

      • Trinity West

        Kristen! I’d love to meet you and hear your stories, I’m sure you have many great stories. I’ll be sure to hit you up on FB, thank you!

    • Trinity West

      We definitely need to talk! Please email me at trinity@speedwayproject.com so we can connect. Thanks!!

      • Trinity West

        It’s funny, too, because I used to do the same thing. I would run searches on the Speedway every so often and would say to myself, “Why isn’t anyone documenting this place? It should be.”

  • Kyle Hansen

    Seen Soundgarden there, a giant of a man with hot girls helping him on stage introduced them by throwing tons of pretzles to the audiance. Mind blowing performance few years before they got huge. Also seen Danzig(might have been same show) on friday 13th. Tickets were a whopping $6.66…..Chuck the drummer was drunk and tripped over nothing on a carpeted floor, and began yelling for someone to mop up the floor….way funny. Many great shows…Stench, Bad Yodelers….too many pits to remember. I too have a box full of posters and slugs….

    • Trinity West

      Kyle, I’d love to work with you! Would you please email me at trinity@speedwayproject.com with your contact info? Thanks!

  • Kyle Hansen

    Seen Soundgarden there, a giant of a man with hot girls helping him on stage introduced them by throwing tons of pretzles to the audiance. Mind blowing performance few years before they got huge. Also seen Danzig(might have been same show) on friday 13th. Tickets were a whopping $6.66…..Chuck the drummer was drunk and tripped over nothing on a carpeted floor, and began yelling for someone to mop up the floor….way funny. Many great shows…Stench, Bad Yodelers….too many pits to remember. I too have a box full of posters and slugs….

  • Kristen Hogan

    I worked the Kiddie Bar for the last year of the Speedway…. The Ministry show was absolute chaos and fun!

    • Trinity West

      Aahh, the Ministry show!!

      • Woody

        Trinity are Willing to dig a little deeper in The SLC secne? I can give you history back to GBH at the Pallaidum. This would be a reach back to 1980 or so busting in to bullshit with Brad Collins after midnite when he was opening the minds of the masses from the radio show. When Raunch was cardboxes in his apartment and Daphine was peddling spiked wrist bands in the basement of the Blue Mouse.

        • Trinity West

          Hey Woody, thanks for the message. I’m sticking strictly to the Speedway days, but I do know of someone who is going back further into the scene for an oral history book. Would you email me at trinity@speedwayproject.com with your contact info? I’d be happy to make a connection. Thanks!

  • Wendi-Kay Gabaldon

    I was only 14 when I heard of this place. My friend and I sat on the steps waiting for it to open to gather fliers for the upcoming shows. When Paul got there we asked him if we could clean the place. So that is how it started for us free admission to any show and a few bucks passed our way. What more could a teenager want. Hanging out with upcoming bands was the best. It is the best time of my life some of the bands i rember is Truce, Pretry Boy Floyd, Love/Hate, Dead Milk men and others I don’t remember the names but remember only the gigs.

    • Trinity West

      Wow, Wendi-Kay, I need to talk to you! You have many incredible stories to share, I’m sure. Please email me at trinity@speedwayproject.com, I’m excited to work with you! Thanks!

  • Jonathan

    One of my favorite memories of the Speedway is actually a more quiet moment. I remember when the Sundays performed there. The concert was very good and the small space made the experience crowded but intimate. My friend and I had a great time and the coolest thing about the concert happened near the end when the band ran out of songs and started playing repeats because they didn’t feel like leaving.

    • rrhl

      I was there too. Top 5 concerts of my life. I loved that they replayed songs but also surprised that they didn’t have (at least) a couple of cover songs. Still have my concert t-shirt as well.

      • Trinity West

        I would love to hear more about your stories. Please email me at trinity@speedwayproject.com with your contact info, it would be great to work with you. Thanks!

    • Trinity West

      Jonathan, this is a great story! Would you mind emailing me at trinity@speedwayproject.com with your contact info? I would love to work with you. Thanks!

  • Tim L.

    I can remember seeing Testament, and Alice in Chains play there before they took off. I can remember meeting band members after some shows. Great memories.

    • Trinity West

      Cool! I’d love to hear more about your stories, Tim.

  • Tim L.

    I still have a ticket stub or two. Saved just about every ticket stub to every show I went to.

    • Trinity West

      Tim, would you share your stories and ticket stubs with the project? Email me at trinity@speedwayproject.com with your contact info so we can work it out. Thanks!

      • salticid

        So saving a ticket stub or two piques your interest for the project? There have been several people who have attested to have been a part of the Speedway *culture* and I noticed that you’ve not noted any interest in that. Are the folk that made the Speedway what it *was*, not as interesting as a ticket stub? Then that just makes it any old club. Really. I kinda thought this was more than a stamp collecting project? The Speedway was much much more than that…

        • Trinity West

          Sorry you feel that way. I wasn’t able to get back to everyone right at once, I’m juggling two kids and needed to take the time to read through each response carefully. I didn’t even realize there were comments on here until a few hours ago! Give me a break, please! If you have a change of heart I’d really be interested in working with you. And I’ll also take your stamps if you have them.

          • metaphysicalgraffiti

            Check your email, sister. 🙂 You’d be surprised who remembers this place. Two kids to juggle? Hell – throw a dog in the mix and we’re on the same page!

          • Trinity West

            Haha! You got me!
            Will check right now, thanks so much!!

          • metaphysicalgraffiti

            Long-winded, all over the place. You are doing an amazing project – go forth, brethren!!!

          • salticid

            I honed in on the responses you gave priority to. That says a lot re: your priorities. By *definition*, really… That’s not not giving you a break for juggling 2 kids, that’s just an observation of what really piqued your interest here. And apparently, the primary lens for the project itself. Which, yeah, was really disheartening. Not gonna lie. Cuz as I said, I kinda thought it was more than that…

            I KNOW the Speedway *means* so much in the *heart* of many, where it was essentially their life and in the own precise words of several here — “home”… That’s no freakin’ ticket stub. That’s *home*. Home is mighty powerful. And not a piece of paper from a fleeting moment! Man, if I have to explain the difference b/w memorabilia and home, there’s no freakin’ point. None at all. It’s your project though! And at least you are doing so! I would hope there’d be focus on what made the place so damn special though. Bands came and went, as they did across many venues at that time. So freakin’ what?? But there was only one Speedway! And isn’t THAT what the project is about? I would hope so!

          • r801

            sensitive sally take it easy on her we were all part of the scene back then .

          • justFUNdimples

            @salticid It is more then just a ticket stub, you’re right. She’s not just searching for pieces of paper… It’s a documentary, so obviously people’s stories and “their own” experiences will add a huge part to this project… and that’s the intent if I read correctly. Yes, she may be grabbing the low hanging fruit at first to get started… If you don’t like it, there’s always the opportunity to get involved and help shape it without passing judgement… You know, kind of like how the scene was (is).

        • r801

          you really need to pull the stick out ….

  • Benjy Ortega

    This place seemed more my home than my own home did, meet some of the greatest coolest down to earth people that to this day still are my family more than most my blood fam. I’m so lucky & blessed to have been a part of the crew there. To this day people still don’t believe that some unknown band called Alice in chains opened for Extreme and then not long after that opened the clash of the Titans tour(Slayer, Megadeth, Anthrax…hell, I still can barely believe that one)….and that was only one of the very many memories and stories that I love recounting when even after all these years I’m asked about the place. For those of you that don’t know there is a group on Facebook for Speedway, come join up! It’s one of the only reasons I even ever get on the FB anymore….tons of amazing pics and scans of fliers and passes and tickets…..if you have some please come share them with the world…..Love and Angst my Speedway peeps!

    • Trinity West

      I owe you a call, sir.

  • Demetria Player

    This was a place that I so called my home during my high school years. Being friends with the boys from The Stench and The Bad Yoddlers was a blast! Oh and that Social Distortion show I so remember… That’s the day I fell in love with them and my fave band since then.

    • Trinity West

      Hey Demetria, I would love to talk to you and hear your Speedway stories. Would you mind emailing me at trinity@speedwayproject.com with your info? Thanks!

  • Slc Scene

    Love this!!!

  • Derek Walker

    Being one of the only colored kids into live hard rocking music. Speedway changed my life. This place put me on a path of musical delightment. If it wasn’t for speedway I highly doubt I’d be playing music today

    • Derek Walker

      Purple fro hawk lol

  • Ahoy SLC, i moved to Utah Valley and then SLC from Vancouver BC when i was about 15 in 1985. I was really tapped into the Vancouver punk culture and Utah was super lame at first… but later, with a fake ID and a VW bus, my time became more fun with Speedway and other hi-jinks.

    I loved taking in 12 Milwaukee’s Best cans to go into the cooler and get served with my “BC Identicard”. I loved the low ceilings and DIY attitude and support local bands as openers. Saw so many shows there but recall:

    – fIREHOSE’s Mike Watt breaking bass string first note of first song and changed it while barely slowing the band down. – Jesus and Mary Chain with so much smoke/fog that i never did see the players.
    – Cramps and Link Wray doing a master class of rock n roll weirdeness.
    – Chickasaw Mudpuppies, Flat Duo Jets, lots of other smaller acts who kinda vanished.

    Goodtimes outside the venue finding out where parties were, what was going on in other towns and all that analog social networking.

    Years later, back in Vancouver, was talking to Randy Rampage (bass Danzig) who told me stories about the heavy metal warlords trip to SLC which would shock a sailor.

    I later played in a band called Spot with a few gigs at Pompadour and others (also sometimes played with Trees in Provo) – saw the historic Nirvana opening for Dino Jr show there too.

  • PS i made a feature-length documentary film in 1996 about commercial hemp in Pacific Northwest called the HempenRoad – was a massive undertaking and later toured it but then it sorta vanished… but now, 20 years later, with cannabis legalization happening, the film now takes on a whole other purpose of being a historical record. In other words, make this film for now and for the future.

  • noxious19

    oh man…tons of memories at the speedway…I was straight edge and hung with a few friends that skirted between the edge/skin scene at the time. I don’t think we missed a show for a couple year period. I was a pit beast and had several very familiar faces that I would consider my pit enemies that I saw at almost every show, we had some fantastic battles for supremacy….my most memorable, and this is unfortunate because it was a super shitty show was VoiVod, I vividly remember standing right against the stage towards the end of the show and thinking “damn these guys suck” and then looking around and seeing like 20 people left in the audience looking like zombies, for some reason it was a very impactful moment for me. I’ll see if I can dig up some memorabilia 😀

  • ManWolf

    I loved this place. It was a 2nd home. Definitely the first place that felt a part of something…felt like I belonged. Some of the best shows I remember were of course the staple bands like INSIGHT and ICEBURN, who became friends. War Zone, Cromags, Slap Shot, Sick of it All to name a few. Loved that place.

  • ManWolf

    I loved this place. It was a 2nd home. Definitely the first place that felt a part of something…felt like I belonged. Some of the best shows I remember were of course the staple bands like INSIGHT and ICEBURN, who became friends. War Zone, Cromags, Slap Shot, Sick of it All to name a few. Loved that place.

  • BigLar

    Oh man I loved the speedway. I saw some great shows, many already mentioned, but I have to say that Ministry was the greatest live performance I have EVER witnessed. After KMFDM broke down their gear (my friends and I had walked to the show and we just caught their last song), and they set up for Ministry, they made us wait. And wait. And wait. Alain taunted us from backstage on the microphone for almost an hour. By the time they came out we were SO PISSED OFF it was insane. I was right in front – there was the usual loogie exchange. And the fences on either side that went up to the ceiling for jumping. After a while we all realized it was our duty to catch the dudes jumping, but every once in a while everyone scattered and the jumper pancaked on the cement. There was more than a little blood. It was my first mosh pit and as hard as everyone fought, after the show we all shook hands and had total respect for each other. I saw a lot of the same people at NIN, The Cramps, Revolting Cocks, and a few others. I’ve been to my fair share of hard shows but this one for me set the standard. The energy was incredible. I remember it like it was yesterday. There will never be another time like the late ’80’s in Salt Lake City.

  • BigLar

    I just read salticid’s bit about the pit, and it’s true, we all knew that once you were on the floor you were screwed. Whenever someone went down 3 or 4 people around them would get them up as fast as possible. And you had to wear boots of some kind, or your feet would be pulverized. Yeah there were a few fights, but most of the time everyone exercised respect and good sportsmanship. You could be elbowing a dude one minute, and picking him (or her) up off of the floor the next. There was something about being soaked in sweat, bruised, cut and bleeding, and clothes ripped up. Everyone should experience that at least once. It was our Fight Club. The other thing you had to know to get the full effect was how to get to the very front no matter how much pressure there was. I could always get right up to the stage. I’m very claustrophobic too but somehow I figured out how to stay calm up there for as long as I wanted.

  • BigLar

    And if you really want to explore that time Trinity, you should do a piece on the Arts Cinema, Cosmic Aeroplane, and the Blue Mouse! Sorry if I’ve been babbling though…..

  • highpriestinaspeedo

    The very first concert I went to there was when Soundgarden opened for Voivod and that security guard hit that kid in the front row over the head and they had to stop the show for 30 minutes because the crowd was on the verge of a riot. The security guard came back on stage and awkwardly apologized to the kid while everyone around me was calling him every name in the book. Eventually Soundgarden resumed their set. Chris Cornell came back on and said, “you guys are pretty fuckin’ spirited!”

    I was there for the last show, but I don’t remember who all the bands were. I remember Boxcar Kids was one of them, but I can’t remember the others. Anyone know?