UMOCA Gala 2018: Seven Deadly Sins

Posted June 11, 2018 in Photos,
Tags:
Share this:Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+0Pin on Pinterest0

The UMOCA (Utah Museum of Contemporary Art) annual gala is always reliably and delightfully indulgent. This year’s theme was Seven Deadly Sins, and the event was held inside the museum’s Main Gallery space. Guests were encouraged to match their clothing to one of the seven traditional vices, namely envy, gluttony, pride, wrath, lust, greed or sloth. A color was paired with each so that guests could display their favorite form of depravity.

The sins were displayed on the walls of the event in tall script, and UMOCA arranged for their own living display of some of the sins as well. Lust was embodied by a tall redheaded woman in a red formal dress, slinking around silently, winking indiscriminately at guests. Sloth was embodied by a young man in a blue shirt carrying around a pillow and laying down for catnaps in the middle of the dance floor or next to the line for cocktails. Gluttony had all types of candy pinned to his clothing, and wandered the party encouraging guests to partake of his delicious outfit. In case guests were experiencing guilt, a pope was on hand at a confessional for quick and easy absolution.

The proceedings included a silent auction for all types of art, much of it created by local artists who have participated in UMOCA‘s Artist-In-Residence program. Also auctioned were trips to Chicago, Austin and New York City. There were performances of acro yoga and dance, as well as more avant-garde displays such as a mock fight between two “servers” illustrating  the sin of wrath. The Blended Table served delectable food including seared ahi served cold with savory black rice pudding, tobiko and avocado butter as well as roasted beet napoleon with spring pea jus, wheat berries, goat chevre crema and chili oil droplets.

During what is UMOCA‘s annual fundraiser, guests were able to eat delicious food, enjoy cocktails and mingle with Utah’s most devoted patrons of the arts, all while showing that Salt City residents love to sin.


Click images for captions