Anthony Peña leads June Pastel to create a unified eclectic sound though a group of musicians that come from a range different genres.

What does it look like to create art that conforms not to the expectations of the world around you but to your own vision of what art should be? Find out at our August SLUG Localized showcase—these three acts’ influences collide onstage to create sounds that are wholly unique and authentic in the truest senses of these words. Opening for Marqueza and June Pastel is Jazzy Olivo, who, true to her name, offers up lively jazz fusion. For a sweaty, sexy, jazzy summer night, join us at Urban Lounge on Thursday, Aug. 15 at 8 p.m. for $5. SLUG Localized is sponsored by Uinta Brewing, High West Distillery, and Spilt Ink SLC.


Anthony Peña can trace the path of musical inspiration that led him to where he is now—it started with ABBA. “I scratched my ABBA CD very heavily,” he says. Then The Bee Gees, then a seminal moment with Michael Jackson: Peña remembers turning on a music video compilation before school—and not making it to school at all, transfixed by the spectacle that was Michael Jackson. The CDs were the byproducts of an immigrant family who, as Peña puts it, “were just taking whatever was handed to them.” Peña’s parents had moved from Venezuela to the U.S. right before he was born, settling on the West Side of the Salt Lake Valley. Along with the pop of the ’80s, the Peña home also echoed with the songs of traditional Venezuelan folk singers.

At age 10, Peña had learned to play guitar, and after a few more years, he’d enrolled in the Peabody Institute, a classical music conservatory at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore, Maryland. “It was either go to school or go on a mission,” Peña says—he chose school.

In between learning to play guitar and enrolling in music school, Peña put out his first solo project at 16. The next year, he formed June Pastel and released a five-song, hard-copy-only EP through Albatross Records. Peña says that the impetus for moving away from recording under his name came from a desire to “create space and space away from me. That’s one thing I’ve been really self-conscious about, is just putting too much of myself on the line.” In other words, June Pastel is a dropbox, a place to store and shape ideas. “It’s a space that I can go into and put my own opinions and thoughts and then step away from it,” Peña says.


“It was either go to school or go on a mission.”

June Pastel
Photo: LmSorenson.net

Peña came up in the Salt Lake music scene that was welcoming to newcomers, to kids just trying to figure out how to make and perform music. “In the time that I was growing up in Salt Lake, there were so many cool bands around and people just doing it themselves. That was such a formative time for me. I just wanted to be like the cool kids!” he says. Music school posed a particular challenge in that he was one of the few students infusing his work with a DIY ethos: “It took a while to feel that what I was doing was valid in that environment,” Peña says. “I’m kind of the odd one out there, in the sense that I’m not engaging with classical spaces or halls.” He’s not writing classical music, and he’s not creating within classical forms. “I love pop. In my academic world, everyone’s pushing the edge hardcore. They’re 2073. There are a lot of people who want to write pop, and they’re two years behind, so I want to find that sweet spot,” Peña says.

Collages, June Pastel’s first album released last June, was built over three years of cross-country travel, time spent reworking and fine-tuning songs and building relationships with other artists. The record is an expansive collaboration that includes at least 14 contributors, a sweet melding of sax-heavy jazz and yearning indie pop. Peña describes the years leading up to the album as “a three-year period of chasing perfection,” during which he was “burning through these phases of what I thought it meant to be a musician.”


“I haven’t been able to shake my passions, and maybe that’s why I have been consistent.”

Over the last year, however, June Pastel has evolved. Peña, now 22, has whittled the core members down to five, mostly Baltimore-based musicians: Andrés Escobar (synths, percussion), John Murphy (bass), Kayin Scanterbury (drums) and Sean McFarland (guitar). He says the band’s new songs lean in a less calibrated direction; practice sessions sometimes sound like a mix of Prince and My Bloody Valentine. “Life is so busy. Having to chase this idea of what it means to make a record can put you out of so much money, time, and honestly, it might not match with the level you’re at, skill-wise. For these new recordings, I recorded it myself with my microphones. I’m going to mix it myself,” he says. “To me, it seems that everything requires this next level of perfection, and that’s unhealthy, unsustainable. So we’re being really radical with it right now, just to build from the bottom up.”

This new phase of music-writing Peña sums up in four words: “Being honest is easier.” This means letting the music lead him. It means holding onto sincerity and authenticity despite the pressures of making music in the era of late-stage capitalism and technological disruption. It means staying true to his work, maintaining a through line that can be traced through his music. “I haven’t been able to shake my passions, and maybe that’s why I have been consistent, because I always just keep coming back to playing shows, setting up shows, getting bands together and building community through that means,” Peña says. “This is the take that we got, and probably a lot of it is what needed to be said. I’m not going to try and force any message across, you know?” Come see for yourself at the August SLUG Localized at Urban Lounge Aug. 15 at 8 p.m.


More on SLUGMag.com:

Local Review: Indigo Plateau – The Heights
The New Nest: Albatross Recordings & Ephemera

(L–R) Lorena Jimenez and Orlando Cabrera.

The season of summer is beloved for the vibrancy, warmth and fruitfulness of our surroundings. On Aug. 9–11, Salt Lake City will celebrate summertime, along with the best of our state’s DIY engineers, craft foodies, performers and craftspeople at the 11th Annual Craft Lake City DIY Festival Presented By Harmons at the Utah State Fairpark. Every year, Craft Lake City commemorates the best of Utah’s creators, this year being CLC’s first at the Utah State Fairpark—there is much to celebrate! Visit craftlakecity.com to learn more about the 11th DIY Festival.


Six generations of secret family mole recipes from Moles La Gran Fiesta are a reason to visit this year’s Craft Lake City DIY Festival. They tout 32 hand-selected, fresh ingredients that make up the delicious moles that are packaged in a powder form, versus the typical paste usually seen in stores. The powder form of their product makes it easy for customers to make mole sauce in their kitchen. Just add water or chicken broth in a pan and simmer it together, making instant mole that tastes homemade.

Moles La Gran Fiesta started back in 1970 with the late Alejandro Cruz. The family-owned business—now run by Cruz’s wife, Lorena Jimenez, and three kids, Cesar Cabrera, Orlando Cabrera and Fatima Cabrera—offers 12 selections of mole ranging from sweet, mild and spicy flavors based on different regions of Mexico, such as Oaxaca, Mexico City and Puebla. With recipes rooted deep in family tradition, they are known for authentic culinary flavors most crave from traditional Mexican cuisine. Their most famous mole is the “Poblano,” which comes from the region known globally as a mole destination, Puebla. This specific mole has a sweet, tangy flavor to it, and it is also one of the family’s favorites because it combines a tremendous original mole taste that’s both spicy and flavorful in addition to its sweetness. While we don’t have their recipe—you’ll have to taste it for yourself—typically, Puebla mole ingredients include unsweetened chocolate, various chiles, cinnamon, spices, tomatoes and onions.

Discover Moles La Gran Fiesta at the DIY Festival, where you can meet the family behind this household staple. Moles La Gran Fiesta can also be purchased online at their site. Shipping is available to all states in the U.S., as it makes for great gift ideas. They also sell their mole every Sunday at the Redwood Swap Meet in West Valley City. They currently sell at all Rancho Markets and a variety of Mexican stores, including El Potrero Market, La Palapa Mexican Restaurant and more. –Mandy Murry


More on SLUGMag.com:

Food Review: Red Iguana
A Taste of Mexique with Chef Carlos Gaytan

Jessica Thesing of Mean Mugs Pottery

The season of summer is beloved for the vibrancy, warmth and fruitfulness of our surroundings. On Aug. 9–11, Salt Lake City will celebrate summertime, along with the best of our state’s DIY engineers, craft foodies, performers and craftspeople at the 11th Annual Craft Lake City DIY Festival Presented By Harmons at the Utah State Fairpark. Every year, Craft Lake City commemorates the best of Utah’s creators, this year being CLC’s first at the Utah State Fairpark—there is much to celebrate! Visit craftlakecity.com to learn more about the 11th DIY Festival.


Looking to take more socially conscious sips this summer? Mean Mugs pottery (meanmugspottery.com), established in 2016, creates industrial-style artisan stoneware pieces that are anything but disposable. Owner Jessica Thesing says, “We’re committed to making products that change people’s relationship with their ‘stuff.’” Thesing and her team make heirloom, lifetime pieces by hand, stewarding a little-to-no waste operation.

Much more than just a drinking vessel, each MMP mug is handmade with recycled materials from start to finish. MMP has invested in equipment that allows them to use wet clay and clay scraps. They also partner with a local recycler to reuse their extra materials. All pieces are hand-thrown on a pottery wheel or individually pressed then completed with the initials of the artisan who made it. The personality and individuality of the craft is essential in making a “mug with meaning.” Whether for work or home, an MMP mug is an item to be cherished and cared for.

In addition to strong eco-friendly values, MMP has community at the heart of their mission. You might see MMP mugs around town at some of your favorite foodie destinations, as they have partnered with local businesses such as The Park Café and A. Fisher Brewery Co. to create unique designs that represent Utah. Thesing says, “Our doors are always open to the community. We participate in local events, offer discounted pricing and donations to nonprofit organizations, and provide input and cooperation to local groups doing amazing things.” As Mean Mugs grows, they hope to host classes and workshops in their studio space.

Mean Mugs are available for business, gift and retail markets. To shop their designs and learn more about their mission, check out their website or find them on Instagram @meanmugspotteryco.  MMP is thrilled to be participating in Craft Lake City DIY Festival this year, be sure to stop by their booth to find an array of pottery and jewelry pieces. –Kia McGinnis Wray


More on SLUGMag.com:

Rose Line Pottery: CLC Artisan
World of More Craft: Craft Lake City Spice Up the Valley

As a Japanese-Venezuelan solo singer and producer, Marina Marqueza strives to represent intersectionality through their music.

What does it look like to create art that conforms not to the expectations of the world around you but to your own vision of what art should be? Find out at our August SLUG Localized showcase—these three acts’ influences collide onstage to create sounds that are wholly unique and authentic in the truest senses of these words. Opening for Marqueza and June Pastel is Jazzy Olivo, who, true to her name, offers up lively jazz fusion. For a sweaty, sexy, jazzy summer night, join us at Urban Lounge on Thursday, Aug. 15 at 8 p.m. for $5. SLUG Localized is sponsored by Uinta Brewing, High West Distillery, and Spilt Ink SLC.


Marqueza’s debut album, Orbit Pluto, had been a long time coming—Marqueza estimates they put five or six years’ worth of thoughts and ideas into the album, a genre-bending, R&B-influenced love song to those who are marginalized and yearning to be whole. It’s been seven months since the album came out, which Marqueza entirely self-produced. Since then, they have been on a mission to immerse themselves in the local-music landscape, and particularly the spaces that are welcoming to and inclusive of marginalized folks.

As a nonbinary Venezuelan-Japanese artist, Marqueza has used music as a way both to explore their own vulnerability, struggles and successes as a queer artist of color and to reach out to others like them. “As a diaspora child, it never really feels like there are solid answers to anything,” Marqueza says via email. Marqueza grew up moving back and forth between the United States and Japan, and their sense of not wholly belonging in one place infuses their music. “I experimented with genres growing up, playing in every kind of band you can think of, breaking every musical rule I could,” Marqueza says. “My experiences were important, but the difference is now I feel confident in the gray areas I inhabit.”


“I realized the more honest I was in how I present myself to the world, the less worried I became about what other people think of me.”

Fully inhabiting their queerness was an important step on the way to living confidently in that in-between space. Marqueza says, “I realized the more honest I was in how I present myself to the world, the less worried I became about what other people think of me, so now I look inward and create only what feels authentic to me.” Exploring and subverting imposed binaries has always been essential to Marqueza’s work. Orbit Pluto simultaneously enforces and transcends binaries—it’s structured to end and begin on the same words, a kind of mirroring or halving, and is studded with the symbolism of opposing forces, the sun and the moon, while other lyrics speak to the fluidity of the masculine and the feminine.


“My experiences were important, but the difference is now I feel confident in the gray areas I inhabit.”

Marqueza shot their first music video, which was released before the album, over two years ago. This summer, they are exploring and reshaping another song with a new video for “The Matrix.” “I am tapping way back into my childhood, my earliest memories of watching music videos and falling in love with the thrilling amalgamation of performance, visual, acting and, of course, the drama of gender and gender expression on film,” Marqueza says.

If Marqueza is breaking binaries in their videos and genre choices, they are also breaking the rules of performing and creating music. “Although I don’t necessarily create jazz music, the dynamic of creating in the moment, bending musical rules to capture the spirit of something rather than doing something that’s been done before feels inherently queer and radical to me,” Marqueza says. “For that reason, trying to honor my own fluidity by allowing myself to say, ‘Fuck the rules,’ has meant [that] what I create is always honest.”


“I hope to be a part of highlighting the diversity of talent that exists here.”

Marina Marqueza
Photo: LmSorenson.net

Music is the one place where Marqueza can be the most vulnerable and the most authentic. “I feel like being vulnerable and in my music gives me an undeniable strength, and I feel the most fulfilled when I am reaching other marginalized people through my art,” they say. Marqueza extends that determination to reach out to other marginalized folks beyond their lyrics, setting boundaries for the kinds of performances and collaborations they are willing to participate in. Marqueza says, “Since I see the shows I play as collaborations, I no longer play on lineups if I feel they are not representational or inclusive of marginalized identities.” Their most recent collaboration was on the Pride stage with Existimos, a local art collective spearheaded by sisters Patricia and Graciela Campos, centered around creating spaces for LGBTQ+ artists of color to perform and create.

Groups like Existimos drive Marqueza forward. “I hope to continue contributing to building a more inclusive network of resources for LGBTQIA+ artists, particularly of color in Salt Lake City,” Marqueza says. “I hope that more people look more critically at their lineups and put some damn intentionality into who they are giving platforms to and who is being left out of the picture.” Their message is one we can—and should—all take to heart. Marqueza says, “I hope to be a part of highlighting the diversity of talent that exists here, affirming through my art and actions that if we truly care about the most marginalized in our society, we need to put our words into action and get serious about the actual work it takes to be truly inclusive in the Salt Lake City music and arts scene, instead of just talking about it.”


More on SLUGMag.com:

Local Review: Marina – Orbit Pluto
Soundwaves Episode 306 – Marina Marqueza

Nicole Morris of Studio Ramiii

The season of summer is beloved for the vibrancy, warmth and fruitfulness of our surroundings. On Aug. 9–11, Salt Lake City will celebrate summertime, along with the best of our state’s DIY engineers, craft foodies, performers and craftspeople at the 11th Annual Craft Lake City DIY Festival Presented By Harmons at the Utah State Fairpark. Every year, Craft Lake City commemorates the best of Utah’s creators, this year being CLC’s first at the Utah State Fairpark—there is much to celebrate! Visit craftlakecity.com to learn more about the 11th DIY Festival.


Officially beginning in January of this year through an elating and well-accepted Instagram post, Studio Ramiii (@studioramiii) has been taking our earlobes by storm with her handcrafted, carefully curated, polymer-clay earrings. The trend of handmade polymer clay earrings has been going strong for a couple years now, and they have been making appearances in most local stores and boutiques. However, Nicole Morris of Studio Ramiii has been able to apply her teachings from her BYU Studio Art bachelor’s degree to really take the reins and tread her own path with this medium by applying unique and inspired patterns/imagery to her wearable art from artists such as Henri Matisse in addition to architecture and nature.

Morris’ venture began at a Bountiful Davis Art Market in November of 2018, as she accompanied her mother, Lonnie Wadley, whose art goes by Mila Roads and who creates handmade leather bags, as a vendor who just wanted to “dip their toes in.” At the time, Morris was creating leather earrings along with her polymer-clay jewelry as she was still experimenting with mediums. After selling out at her first market, it was clear that the next step was to dive into the warm waters. The name for Morris’ art (Studio Ramiii) is actually an acronym for her husband’s full name, Richard Alexander Morris III: “I guess I just really like him!” she says.

Using the slab, marble and flat-art techniques, Morris creates a large range of styles and is constantly pumping out new ideas day by day. Morris finds it difficult to recreate pieces because, for her, creating each piece is a different form of expression that cannot be duplicated. Nonetheless, this makes it so each piece is truly unique and priceless. Morris recently created a limited-edition collaboration series with embroiderist Aurelia Gowen—a collection of the same floral pattern that they worked on together—truly seamless. Come meet Morris and feast your eyes on her polymer creations at this year’s DIY Festival where on the Saturday of that weekend, Aug. 10, she will be doing a buy-two-get-the-third-pair-free deal! –Bianca Velasquez


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Anika Quinn Jewelry: Craft Lake City Artisan
Desert Rose: Craft Lake City Artisan

David Purcell of Utah Student Robotics

The season of summer is beloved for the vibrancy, warmth and fruitfulness of our surroundings. On Aug. 9–11, Salt Lake City will celebrate summertime, along with the best of our state’s DIY engineers, craft foodies, performers and craftspeople at the 11th Annual Craft Lake City DIY Festival Presented By Harmons at the Utah State Fairpark. Every year, Craft Lake City commemorates the best of Utah’s creators, this year being CLC’s first at the Utah State Fairpark—there is much to celebrate! Visit craftlakecity.com to learn more about the 11th DIY Festival.


For the last five years, the Utah Student Robotics Team (@utahstudentrobotics) has been completely in charge of conceptualizing and manufacturing space mining robots to compete annually against other colleges from around the country at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center.

Reverting from building robots to mine on Mars, “We are mining mostly for water now,” says David Purcell, former student and President of Utah Student Robotics. The robotics team is technically part of the School of Mechanical Engineering. However, to be part of the team, all you need is a desire to participate.

“We actually really appreciate working with students from all majors that are not science, math or engineering-based. For instance, liberal arts majors tend to help us with social media and marketing, and finance majors help us with the accounting.”

Simply put, Utah Student Robotics team is a group of students who build mining bots to be sent to Mars and the moon. The robots are designed to dig through a material called regolith (aka space dirt) to get to frozen water. “The lighter the rover, the more points you get when competing,” says Purcell. Because it costs about $10,000 per pound to launch anything into space, the team had to come up with cost-effective manufacturing strategies. “It just made sense to use 3D printing, because not only is the material light and relatively cheap, [but] none of the students are master carpenters.” From the tires to the mainframe, anywhere on the robot that is red, white, green or black has been made on a 3D printer.

With this type of innovation happening right in our backyard, it’s no surprise that the Utah Students Robotics team will be a returning Google Fiber STEM participant at this year’s DIY Festival. “Being a STEM participant at the DIY Festival allows us to showcase our bots and educate people on the exciting things we’re doing in space,” says Purcell. So, if you find your way into the STEM Building at the festival, check out the student Robotics Team. If you’re lucky, they just might let you drive one of their robots! –Lauren Ashley


More on SLUGMag.com:

Sunzeecar: Craft Lake City DIY Engineer
Sumo Bots: Robot Fanatics Unite

(L–R) Dane and Sara Goodwin of Goodies and Co.

The season of summer is beloved for the vibrancy, warmth and fruitfulness of our surroundings. On Aug. 9–11, Salt Lake City will celebrate summertime, along with the best of our state’s DIY engineers, craft foodies, performers and craftspeople at the 11th Annual Craft Lake City DIY Festival Presented By Harmons at the Utah State Fairpark. Every year, Craft Lake City commemorates the best of Utah’s creators, this year being CLC’s first at the Utah State Fairpark—there is much to celebrate! Visit craftlakecity.com to learn more about the 11th DIY Festival.


Trinket, art and vintage-clothing vendors Goodies and Co. (@goodies.and.co) started out small. Dane Goodwin was selling paintings and prints outside the Farmers’ Market and eventually worked his way up to selling his artwork at festivals. He and his wife, Sara Goodwin, bonded over their love for making fun art, and after the first pin they made together (their iconic gumball pin) caught a lot of attention, they decided that it was time to take it to the next level. They started to sell pins, stickers and screen prints at different festivals.

At first, they started out with art and pins, but the Goodwins saw an opportunity to expand on their mutual love of thrifting and introduced vintage clothes to their booths and eventual storefront. “We’re sick of men’s sections full of navy clothes and women’s sections full of fast-fashion crop tops,” Sara says. Dane’s love for bright, fun fashion and Sara’s keen sense of style come together to find rad, vintage clothing for those who want to dress outside of the box. Thus the current incarnation of Goodies and Co. was born. “It’s a hodge-podge of trinkets, art and vintage clothing that are geared toward the colorful and eccentric,” Sara says.

As far as vintage clothes go, Goodies and Co. loves to focus on fun ’80s prints and textiles. “We try to find the most interesting, unique pieces we can get our hands on,” Sara says. This can be a range of T’s, cat sweaters, denim vests and more. “We want you to wear something that makes you feel good,” Sara says. “We want the clothes from yesteryear to have another breath.We’re no respecter of decades, but think that the styles from the last 40 years are more up our alley.”

While Goodies and Co. are known for their original trinkets, they’re definitely a hot-spot for your vintage-fashion fix. This is their fourth year participating in the Craft Lake City DIY Festival. –Zaina Abujebarah


More on SLUGMag.com:

Endless Indulgence: A Retro Dream for the Modern Soul
Filling the Void: Vintage, Art and Music at VOID MRKT

Christopher Nelson of The Hive Mind Apiary

The season of summer is beloved for the vibrancy, warmth and fruitfulness of our surroundings. On Aug. 9–11, Salt Lake City will celebrate summertime, along with the best of our state’s DIY engineers, craft foodies, performers and craftspeople at the 11th Annual Craft Lake City DIY Festival Presented By Harmons at the Utah State Fairpark. Every year, Craft Lake City commemorates the best of Utah’s creators, this year being CLC’s first at the Utah State Fairpark—there is much to celebrate! Visit craftlakecity.com to learn more about the 11th DIY Festival.


As a chef, The Hive Mind Apiary (thehivemindapiary.com) owner Christopher Nelson has always wanted to find new ways to eliminate food waste, which damages the ecosystem—and much of it is fats. Having taken interest in bee-keeping by accident during an episode of a HowStuffWorks podcast, Nelson purchased a used suit, hive boxes and a smoker from a local classifieds ad and mail-ordered the wire mesh box (roughly shoebox-size) to his front door then started beekeeping. This led to the creation of yummy, infused local honeys and incredible soaps, which will be available at this year’s Craft Lake City DIY Festival.

A favorite of Nelson’s is the Sriracha-infused local raw honey, a sweet, savory, spicy offering! The sweetness of the honey meets the heat of the chile peppers, and the garlic gives it a savory background to build from. It’s paired perfectly for grilling chicken or seafood—add a spoonful to cornbread or a good vanilla-bean ice cream.

If you are looking for soap, try the Peppermint and Coffee Soap Bar. It’s great for the kitchen, as the coffee grounds offer an excellent scrub and are naturally deodorizing. “The coffee grounds are also un-brewed, so the caffeine tightens the skin and increases blood flow/circulation naturally—all with the fresh scent of peppermint,” Nelson says.

During bee-hibernation season, Nelson collects and renders the discarded fat in the food to make soap. “In this way, even though it’s an animal product, I can produce a genuinely ethical product that is not only entirely local but also beneficial to the local environment,” he says. “Adding honey to the soap was just a no-brainer. Not only does the natural sugar add lather to the final product, but the honey is also packed with vitamins that are wonderful for your skin. And in this way, you don’t have to cover yourself in honey to receive them.”

You can find The Hive Mind Apiary every weekend at the Downtown Farmers’ Market and the Wheeler Farm Farmer’s Market, online at their site or on Facebook and Instagram @thehivemindapiary. –Mandy Murry


More on SLUGMag.com:

Queen Farina: Craft Lake City Craft Food
Downtown Farmer’s Market Opening Day @ Pioneer Park 06.08

Haylee Morice

The season of summer is beloved for the vibrancy, warmth and fruitfulness of our surroundings. On Aug. 9–11, Salt Lake City will celebrate summertime, along with the best of our state’s DIY engineers, craft foodies, performers and craftspeople at the 11th Annual Craft Lake City DIY Festival Presented By Harmons at the Utah State Fairpark. Every year, Craft Lake City commemorates the best of Utah’s creators, this year being CLC’s first at the Utah State Fairpark—there is much to celebrate! Visit craftlakecity.com to learn more about the 11th DIY Festival.


In a land of lucid daydreams and gentle vulnerability, artist Haylee Morice (@hayleemorice) reaches those who can relate to the delicacy of an open and tender heart. She does this through her somber but warm illustrations. Inspired by artists James Jean, Sachin Teng and João Ruas, and photographers Marilyn Mugot and Jeff Davenport, Morice defines herself through the melancholy, eerie, feminine characters she depicts in her own artwork. At 23 years old, Eagle Mountain, Utah, artist Morice has refined her strengths for digital, watercolor, colored-pencil, oil-paint and surrealist still-life images over the 10 years that she has been creating artwork. Morice says, “My personal favorite [medium] would have to be digital because as a perfectionist, it’s nice to be able to experiment without getting too committed to whatever you’ve put down on paper.”

Morice carries a penchant for a Japanese-inspired, manga-esque motif, a strong influence behind Morice’s work. This is most prevalent in Morice’s five pieces dedicated to Studio Ghibli works: My Neighbor Totoro, Princess Mononoke, Spirited Away, Howl’s Moving Castle and Kiki’s Delivery Service. “At age 17, I decided to stop making fan art and focused primarily on my own ideas, having also decided that art was the field I wanted to go into for a career,” says Morice. Currently, Morice’s work is defined by a range of pink and blue hues, shaping sleepy, quiet cities at night with whimsical femme characters caught up in the dreamland’s gloomy trance.

Outside of her bachelor’s degree from Utah State University, Morice values being primarily self-taught. “I don’t think formal training is necessary if you have the motivation and desire to learn on your own,” Morice says. Morice’s work ethic and values are displayed in the time she puts into every piece. “Some take five to 10 hours, and some take 20–30 hours. I once spent 60 hours on one oil painting,” Morice says. Come take a stroll in the world that Haylee Morice has created at the DIY Festival where she will have prints, stickers and screen-printed T’s. –Bianca Velasquez


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10-Year CLC Artisan: Candace Jean
Adding Sass to Your Art Collection: Meet Artist Heather Mahler

Momentum Recycling General Manager Jason Utgaard

The season of summer is beloved for the vibrancy, warmth and fruitfulness of our surroundings. On Aug. 9–11, Salt Lake City will celebrate summertime, along with the best of our state’s DIY engineers, craft foodies, performers and craftspeople at the 11th Annual Craft Lake City DIY Festival Presented By Harmons at the Utah State Fairpark. Every year, Craft Lake City commemorates the best of Utah’s creators, this year being CLC’s first at the Utah State Fairpark—there is much to celebrate! Visit craftlakecity.com to learn more about the 11th DIY Festival.


Since 2008, Momentum Recycling (utah.momentumrecycling.com) has single-handedly served the Wasatch Front with affordable, easy, “no worry” glass-recycling services. They’ve grown considerably since their first curb-side glass haul, and Craft Lake City is honored to have Momentum Recycling participate as a Google Fiber STEM member in the 11th Annual DIY Festival this month.

Prior to 2008, Salt Lake County residents had to take their used glass to designated bins around the valley to get recycled. Though many Utahns are environmentally friendly and pro-Earth, having to store and haul glass hamstrung people’s recycling efforts. “Momentum Recycling was simply started to satisfy a need,” says Jason Utgaard, General Manager of the company. Momentum’s initial glass-haul mission has since become a state-of-the-art glass-recycling warehouse with advanced crushing-and-sorting machines, 25 drivers, managing office personnel and a handful of municipal contracts that extend throughout Utah and into parts of Nevada and Idaho.

“Our goal is zero waste,” says Utgaard. “With constant advancements in technology, we can become more efficient and more sustainable.” This is exactly why CLC decided to invite Momentum Recycling into Google Fiber’s STEM Building at the Festival. Surprisingly, there are a few myths surrounding glass recycling—that glass is sent to China or crushed glass is unusable, for instance. For the last 25 years, China has only accepted plastics, as glass is too heavy to ship overseas. Crushed glass sustains the recycling cycle, so Momentum takes crushed and broken glass from any tax-paying citizen.

“Glass is the most eco-friendly product a person can use. It’s easy to recycle, it’s safe to recycle, and a lot of industries use recycled glass byproducts, like fiberglass,” says Utgaard.

At the festival, Momentum facilitates “recycled glass art,” says Utgaard. For more detailed information on glass recycling in Utah, visit Momentum Recycling in the STEM Building at the DIY Festival. –Lauren Ashley


More on SLUGMag.com:

Momentum Recycling: Making Up for Lost Glass
Utah Recycling Alliance: 4th Annual Zero Waste Awards