Provo-based Mortigi Tempo released their latest album, Memento Mori, this summer, and out of nowhere, it developed into a concept album. Imbuing surf rock– and Ennio Morricone–like instrumentation, Mortigi Tempo have created a spaghetti Western mélange in this latest effort. “On this album, many people have come across the idea of this almost being our Pink Floyd, Animal Collective type of idea, or even some Morrissey,” says guitarist/vocalist Chris Fallo. “I always just loved the Spanish guitar, that surf, spaghetti Western feel.” Think The Good, the Bad & the Ugly.

They feel that this endeavor is more than a collection of tracks and that it necessitates a thorough listen of the whole album due to its depth. “You can’t just sit back and listen to one song and you go, ‘OK, I like that song,’” Fallo says. “You can stuck listening to the whole, entire album because it’s almost emotional.” Guitarist/keyboardist/vocalist Nicholas Allen heralds the flow from start to finish in the album and its attention-grabbing qualities.

Regarding the band’s aims, “For us, always doing more with our music has always meant working less and just recording and writing more,” says Fallo. “We’ve never cared too much [about] the whole idea of being famous or getting recognition. It’s never been exactly important. For us, the more important thing is just to continue playing and to continue growing and to always have momentum behind us.”

“Our music is always growing and always changing,” Allen says of the Mortigi Tempo record collection comprising Bob Your Head, Suzie, Dead Water and Memento Mori. The band strives to evolve their sound from record to record. They assert, though, that the best way to experience the band is live, whether it be at ABG’s in Provo or on a prospective West Coast tour. Find Mortigi Tempo’s music at mortigitempoband.bandcamp.com.


Thanks for listening to SLUG Mag Soundwaves.

  • This podcast was created by SLUG Magazine and produced by Angela H. Brown and Secily Saunders
  • Associate Producers: Alexander Ortega, Joshua Joye, John Ford, Kathy Zhou
  • Executive Producer: Angela H. Brown
  • Background music by Mortigi Tempo
  • Soundwaves logo and art design by Nicholas Dowd
  • Technical design by Kate Colgan
  • Photo courtesty: Mortigi Tempo

SLUG Magazine’s mission is to provide an honest journalistic alternative to mainstream coverage of arts, music, events and lifestyle. SLUG adds value to lifestyle through community engagement. Available in print and digitally on SLUGmag.com.

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