Redmond Farm Kitchen: Bringing The Country to the City

Food Reviews

Growing up in a rural town affords a charm that often gets left behind for a bustling life in a metropolitan area. Swinging screen doors, a night sky untouched by light pollution, working a summer on a classmate’s farm and getting paid in berry cobbler (which seems like a hell of a deal when you’re 14)—these memories came to mind when I wandered into Redmond Farm Kitchen.

"The Spicy Avocado Burger came with a cheese-crusted, house-made brioche bun that garnered my enthusiasm."
Photo: John Taylor

The breakfast and brunch options at Redmond are unique that every egg, tomato and glass of milk is sourced from local farms such as Rivendell in Heber City, Brickhouse Growers in Orem and Redmond’s own farm. They take pride in providing raw milk and cheese options that are bacteria-tested to the strictest degree, free of hormones and additives and provided by cows that (rightfully) get to graze around all day. While browsing their extensive menu, The Farm Boy ($9.99)—two oatcakes, uncured bacon and eggs—provided the perfect amount of breakfast for me. I also selected the Green Juice ($9.99 for 12 oz, $12.99 for 16 oz), a hand-pressed mix of raw kale, celery, ginger, cucumber and lemon.

The oatcakes were dense and accompanied by Redmond’s raw butter and maple syrup. The eggs had an amber-orange yolk, a sign of a happy, healthy chicken. They tasted as good as they looked and were dusted with salt and pepper, though not enough to distract from the pure egginess. The bacon complimented the eggs with a tangy, savory crunch. The Farm Boy is five steps above food you prepare when you’re camping but gives the same rugged feel of simplicity and connecting with nature. Green juice is my holy grail for a Saturday morning, and Redmond produces a hefty, condensed amount—this thing is an invigorating jolt to the system.

For lunch options, I went with the Spicy Avocado Burger ($10.99) and a side of Garlic & Herb Fries ($3.99). The fries came out first, and I could smell them from ten feet away. The only thing better than the smell was the taste, credited to local Rivendell potatoes, Redmond Real Salt, herbs de Provence and a garlic-infused avocado oil that made the fries airy and bursting with flavor. The only reason I didn’t lick my fingers was because I remembered I was in public.

The Spicy Avocado Burger came with a cheese-crusted, house-made brioche bun that garnered my enthusiasm. The patty itself was juicy, but not greasy, thin, but not flimsy, and smothered in melted raw cheese. As a former consumer of all things ultra-processed throughout my college years, I could definitely taste the difference. If you’re looking for a kick-in-the-nostrils spicy entree, this is not the burger for you. If you prioritize freshness and quality produce (such as creamy avocado, succulent microgreens, juicy tomatoes and flavorful honey apple-cider vinegar aioli), this one is definitely worth a try.

I couldn’t resist ordering a glass of Redmond’s famous milk, so I went with their Chocolate Milk ($4.99 for a small, $6.79 for a large). As expected, there was a layer of cream that naturally settled at the top of the glass, but the milk itself wasn’t heavy on the tongue. It was smooth, not too sweet and worth every second of lactose intolerance. I thought my sweet tooth was satisfied until I walked by the pie case at the front of the kitchen. The Banana Creme, with mounds of soft, pudding-like bananas topped with fresh whipped cream nestled onto a crispy crust, beckoned me, so I boxed some up to take home. The nostalgic crunch and age-old recipe brought back hometown diner lunches with my grandmother—two hands, one small and another wrinkled, holding forks over a piece of pie.

Redmond Farm Kitchen offers seasonal produce, farm-fresh eggs, dairy and meat from local ranchers year round at their Farm Stores connected to their kitchens in Sugarhouse, Orem and Heber City. Find more information at redmondfarms.com.

More on Utah gardening and farming:
Urban Micro Farming Power: The Story of Lincoln Street Farm and Growing Food For The Community
Fresh Fruit For Plotting Vegetables: Al Grossi, The Punk Rock Farmer