Home Glow Hydroponics is a local business that offers consultation, products and produce to help make soil-free gardening more accessible.

Home Glow Hydroponics: Craft Lake City DIY Engineers

Tech

Founded by Philip Sadler and with the creative inspiration of his 8-year-old daughter, Remy, Home Glow Hydroponics is a local business that offers consultation, products and produce to help make soil-free gardening more accessible. Home Glow Hydroponics is displaying at the Craft Lake City Virtual DIY Festival, showcasing how to start your own hydroponic project.

Home Glow started as a way for father and daughter to explore the world of science together in their own home. “I grew up in my father’s lab, watching him bring life to experimentation. Home Glow Hydroponics started as a way for me to introduce my daughter to applied sciences,” says Sadler.

The father-daughter team at Home Glow Hydroponics wants to take your home gardening to the next level.
Photo: John Barkiple

Before long, Home Glow grew into a larger operation with the help of partners and volunteers, including the South Salt Lake Permaculture Guild. Home Glow began selling produce to local restaurants and helping other people and businesses grow a wide range of crops in their own hydroponic gardens. “With hydroponics, you can design a watering system within your home, on your walls and windows, custom to your space, that can grow an assortment of plants through all seasons,” says Sadler. By providing starter kits, installations and DIY tutorials, Home Glow makes home hydroponic projects accessible to anyone.

For the DIY Festival, Sadler plans on putting together virtual DIY sessions to help Utahns with home projects. The sessions will focus on the basics and benefits of hydroponics, hydroponic home systems and crops, and how to grow microgreens and tomatoes. “We’d like to take the chance to explain what exactly goes into hydroponics and the benefits it has on the food supply chain,” Sadler says. “Hydroponic fruits and vegetables can be grown using considerably less water and space. In many cases, hydroponic produce is more nutrient dense and sustainable,” says Sadler.

Visit their website or follow them on Instagram @homeglowhydroponics to learn more. –Tim Schoof