Local Reviews: Night Sweats

Local Reviews: Night Sweats
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Usually, an EP will comprise a few songs representing a short body of work by a band. In the case of Night Sweats’ Red EP, four songs make up over 30 minutes of dark yet poppy electronic indie music. I keep seeing references to them on my Facebook feed. Red makes it quickly obvious why they’re on every tongue and fingertip. … read more

Local Reviews: The Rose Phantom

Local Reviews: The Rose Phantom
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The latest release by Salt Lake’s own Ted Newsom, Abandon represents a new direction as Newsom turned his back on his other projects to focus two years’ time on the Rose Phantom persona and work. Marrying lush dramatics and intricate electronica, the album’s 10 tracks of careful and succinct industrial-tinged darkwave would not be out of place in a goth club or in an alternative radio station’s rotation. … read more

Review: Dash Rip Rock

Review: Dash Rip Rock
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In the almost 30 years since they formed, Louisiana Music Hall of Famers Dash Rip Rock have been making rollicking swamp-rock with equal doses of punk and country and even a little metal. … read more

Review: John Cale

Review: John Cale
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John Cale
Shifty Adventures in Nookie Wood
Double Six
Street: 10.01.12
John Cale = Bauhaus + The Velvet Underground x Brian Eno
Stand back, kids … at 70, sporting pink dye in his white hair, legend John Cale (The Velvet Underground and too many others to name) is rockin’, and not in a rockin’ chair, son. This album is chockful of his smooth and unmistakable voice––like the voice Jim Morrison might have grown into––his standard drone and his louche lyrics that rival Leonard Cohen’s for their depth. You don’t so much listen to Nookie Woods as you get grabbed and bodily hauled in for some very shifty adventures, indeed. The opener, “I Wanna Talk 2 U,” a collaboration with hip-hop producer Danger Mouse, explodes out of your speakers. The masterful “Hemmingway” rattles you with its building intensity, while “Face to the Sky” is a gorgeous melding of electronic and organic elements, a swooping, woozy nod to Dali’s Car and Bowie. But lest all this ancient name-dropping makes you think the album is a throwback, worry not: there’s nothing old-fashioned about it. Cale seems committed to moving forward with music, playing around with over-processed autotune on “December Rain,” but he’s not afraid of organic acoustic sounds, as on “Mary.” If you don’t already know Cale, it’s time you met him, and a trip to the Nookie Woods is a fine place to start. –Madelyn Boudreaux … read more

Review: Judy Kang

Review: Judy Kang
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A comparison to Bjork is not the way to my heart; her music is like listening to a fax machine have a nervous breakdown. … read more

Review: Crime and the City Solution – American Twilight

Review: Crime and the City Solution – American Twilight
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Critics’ darlings who never quite made the mainstream grade back in the early 1990s, Crime are back with their first release in 20-plus years. … read more

Review: Davey Suicide – Self-Titled

Review: Davey Suicide – Self-Titled
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I don’t know when the metal kids started making industrial music, or when the rivets started headbanging. Maybe it was always so, but I swear, when I was in school, the twain never met except to fight. That is no more, and there’s no better proof than on this eponymous album: 14 tracks of nuclear metal crossed with industrial distortion and quite a few bad words, oh my! … read more

Review: Binary – Amber EP

Review: Binary – Amber EP
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Deeply layered and grungy post-goth indie-rock, this five-track EP is like a postcard from a downgraded northern town in England, postmarked 1989. … read more

Review: Depeche Mode – Delta Machine

Review: Depeche Mode – Delta Machine
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After 35-plus years of making sly and danceable new wave electronica, a band might be forgiven for letting it get a bit stale.  … read more

Review: How to Destroy Angels – Welcome Oblivion

Review: How to Destroy Angels – Welcome Oblivion
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With a name referencing an early Coil song and featuring industrial (hair)god Trent Reznor, how could this not be good? … read more