Deng Tear – Backside 180 Late Flip. Photo: Niels Jensen
Deng Tear – Backside 180 Late Flip. Photo: Niels Jensen

SLUG’s sixth incarnation of Summer of Death: Roughside Presented by Monster took place over the past weekend. Roughside is a travelling contest that has mainly centered in the downtown Salt Lake area in the past. This time around, the West Valley/Taylorsville area got some love from some 30-plus skaters eager to win some prizes and huck some tricks.

The spots of the day were: “DIY Spot” at the cultural center, 10-stair at The Maverick Center, West Valley TRAX Station, eight-stair rail at Taylorsville High School, T-ville Skate Park and finally, the awards and product toss hosted by Graywhale. West Valley is much different than Downtown—there aren’t any businessmen in suits or bums tying off in broad daylight. The sidewalks are free of crowds, and the bust factor is minimal.

The DIY Spot was intended for warm-up/registration, but that didn’t stop the growing group of skaters from ripping as hard as they could. Mike Zanelli rattled off plenty of backside maneuvers (50-50, crook, lip and tail) on the concrete kicker to the tall skinny ledge. Jordan Brown had a battle with a noseblunt on the skinny ledge that he finally won as the contest switched to the next spot.

Jordan Brown must have been pretty psyched on that nose blunt because he landed a kickflip at the Maverick Center ten stair within minutes of him and his twin brother Nate showing up to the spot. Deng Tear got himself dizzy after a number of attempts at a backside 360, but in the end, he rolled away with no hand drag. Jose Suitt landed a backside 180 and a shuvit tailgrab. Suitt also had his own battle with a frontside flip that he gave up on due to the crowd congregating to the TRAX station.

Controlled chaos is what was happening at the third stop of the contest. Wherever you looked, tricks were being stomped. The crowd grew from a couple of skaters to a group of hoodlums that could be mistaken for an Occupy movement if they had picket signs instead of boards. One TRAX employee decided to take video of the contest instead of trying to kick out the massive amount of skateboarders taking up the plaza. Plenty of grinds and slides on the handrail and even more tricks down the stair set were landed at the congested spot. Some notable tricks were: tre flip down the set by Jerry Alvarado, blunt to fakie on the handrail by Jose Suitt, and a nose manual firecracker by Eric Ferguson on the steps.

The last spots of the day were Taylorsville High School and T-ville Skatepark where some of the most heavy-hitting bangers went down. Deng Tear landed a back lip on the eight stair rail and ended the day with a heelflip down the four block. Mr. Suitt was able to get some redemption by taking that frontside flip to the side of the blocks and rolled away clean. As Jason “Chedder” Gianchetta directed the crowd to head to Graywhale, he proclaimed, “Be careful when you’re crossing the street—this is West Valley and they don’t give a fuck!”

Third Place went to youngling Deng Tear, who kept it consistent throughout the contest. Brandon Aguayo won Second Place and best trick for a bigspin front boardslide to fakie at T-ville. Aguayo also landed a frontside bigspin down the four block at T-ville, which garnered plenty of applause from the crowd. Last—but actually First—Jose Suitt took top honors for killing it at every spot. SLUG would like to give thanks to all of the sponsors who helped out with Summer of Death: Roughside Presented by Monster: After Dark Skateboards, Blue Plate Diner, Graywhale Entertainment, iNi Cooperative, Jaybird Sport, Milo Sport, Natural Cause Productions, Publik Coffee, Roughneck Hardware, Saga Outerwear and Salty Peaks. See you scum next year.

Photo gallery by Niels Jensen, Sam Milianta and Weston Colton.

SLUG would like to give thanks to all of the sponsors who helped out with Summer of Death: Roughside Presented by Monster:After Dark Skateboards, Blue Plate Diner, Graywhale Entertainment, iNi Cooperative, Jaybird Sport, Milo Sport, Natural Cause Productions, Publik Coffee, Roughneck Hardware, Saga Outerwear and Salty Peaks.

Part of SLUG’s 16th Annual Summer of Death skate series, the sixth annual Roughside Presented By Monster took place on Saturday, Sept. 12. Roughside is a traveling contest that has mainly centered in the Downtown Salt Lake area in the past. This time around, the West Valley/Taylorsville area got some love from 30-plus skaters eager to win some prizes and huck some tricks. Congratulations to First Place winner Jose Suitt. Go to SLUGmag.com for the full recap and a photo gallery by Niels Jensen, Sam Milianta and Weston Colton.

SLUG would like to give thanks to all of the sponsors who helped out with Summer of Death: Roughside VI Presented by Monster: After Dark Skateboards, Blue Plate Diner, Graywhale Entertainment, iNi Cooperative, Jaybird Sport, Milo Sport, Natural Cause Productions, Publik Coffee, Roughneck Hardware, Saga Outerwear and Salty Peaks.

Deng Tear – Backside 180 Late Flip. Photo: Niels Jensen
Deng Tear – Backside 180 Late Flip. Photo: Niels Jensen
Deng Tear – Backside 180 Late Flip. Photo: Niels Jensen

SLUG’s sixth incarnation of Summer of Death: Roughside Presented by Monster took place over the past weekend. Roughside is a travelling contest that has mainly centered in the downtown Salt Lake area in the past. This time around, the West Valley/Taylorsville area got some love from some 30-plus skaters eager to win some prizes and huck some tricks.

 

The spots of the day were: “DIY Spot” at the cultural center, 10-stair at The Maverick Center, West Valley TRAX Station, eight-stair rail at Taylorsville High School, T-ville Skate Park and finally, the awards and product toss hosted by Graywhale. West Valley is much different than Downtown—there aren’t any businessmen in suits or bums tying off in broad daylight. The sidewalks are free of crowds, and the bust factor is minimal.

 

The DIY Spot was intended for warm-up/registration, but that didn’t stop the growing group of skaters from ripping as hard as they could. Mike Zanelli rattled off plenty of backside maneuvers (50-50, crook, lip and tail) on the concrete kicker to the tall skinny ledge. Jordan Brown had a battle with a noseblunt on the skinny ledge that he finally won as the contest switched to the next spot.

 

Jordan Brown must have been pretty psyched on that nose blunt because he landed a kickflip at the Maverick Center ten stair within minutes of him and his twin brother Nate showing up to the spot. Deng Tear got himself dizzy after a number of attempts at a backside 360, but in the end, he rolled away with no hand drag. Jose Suitt landed a backside 180 and a shuvit tailgrab. Suitt also had his own battle with a frontside flip that he gave up on due to the crowd congregating to the TRAX station.

 

Controlled chaos is what was happening at the third stop of the contest. Wherever you looked, tricks were being stomped. The crowd grew from a couple of skaters to a group of hoodlums that could be mistaken for an Occupy movement if they had picket signs instead of boards. One TRAX employee decided to take video of the contest instead of trying to kick out the massive amount of skateboarders taking up the plaza. Plenty of grinds and slides on the handrail and even more tricks down the stair set were landed at the congested spot. Some notable tricks were: tre flip down the set by Jerry Alvarado, blunt to fakie on the handrail by Jose Suitt, and a nose manual firecracker by Eric Ferguson on the steps.

 

The last spots of the day were Taylorsville High School and T-ville Skatepark where some of the most heavy-hitting bangers went down. Deng Tear landed a back lip on the eight stair rail and ended the day with a heelflip down the four block. Mr. Suitt was able to get some redemption by taking that frontside flip to the side of the blocks and rolled away clean. As Jason “Chedder” Gianchetta directed the crowd to head to Graywhale, he proclaimed, “Be careful when you’re crossing the street—this is West Valley and they don’t give a fuck!”

 

Third Place went to youngling Deng Tear, who kept it consistent throughout the contest. Brandon Aguayo won Second Place and best trick for a bigspin front boardslide to fakie at T-ville. Aguayo also landed a frontside bigspin down the four block at T-ville, which garnered plenty of applause from the crowd. Last—but actually First—Jose Suitt took top honors for killing it at every spot. SLUG would like to give thanks to all of the sponsors who helped out with Summer of Death: Roughside Presented by Monster: After Dark Skateboards, Blue Plate Diner, Graywhale Entertainment, iNi Cooperative, Jaybird Sport, Milo Sport, Natural Cause Productions, Publik Coffee, Roughneck Hardware, Saga Outerwear and Salty Peaks. See you scum next year.

 

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DB Longboard

DB Longboards

Pioneer Bamboo Fiberglass 40
dblongboards.com

As an older man with my skate park days well behind me, longboarding seemed like a great way to skate without being tempted to hurt myself on a half pipe. To this end, the Pioneer 40 was the perfect choice. DB Longboards pulled out all the stops to make this a comfortable and responsive ride. At just over three feet in length, the standing area feels roomy without feeling like a surfboard. The bamboo-fiberglass construction allows for a good amount of flexibility, and its concave and springy shape provides the perfect amount of both flex and grip. The Atlas Trucks are mounted in a drop-through fashion, which allows for the addition of big, forgiving wheels while keeping the rider stable and close to the ground. The Cloud Ride wheels, bearings and spacers grip the road and absorb most of the shock. I feel safe and at home on this longboard. I’ve taken it through the neighborhood, shot up and down inclines and carved corners with almost no effort. If you’ve been looking for a relaxing way to start skating again, let the fine folks at DB Longboards pair you up with a solid ride. –James Bennett


DB Longboards

Urban Native 38
dblongboards.com

If you’re looking for a new way to get around this summer, or maybe even want a greener approach to transportation, equip yourself with a smoother ride than a skateboard. A new longboard is the perfect tool to make your way across campus or to bar hop downtown. No need to pay for a taxi or get a DUI—rest your feet and worries on the flexible camber of the Urban Native 38 by DB Longboards. This board is perfect for the technical downhill riders or freestyle moves— it’s a set up that can appeal to everyone. DB Longboards have a vast selection of versatile cruisers to choose from, and customize on the website. The Urban Nature 38 provides great flex while riding, and the drop through mounted trucks lower the board for easier pushing and sliding. The wheels are 69 mm Cloud Ride Cruisers, which are able to slide with minimal speed. You may as well be riding on a cloud with this board. –Michael Sanchez

Shred fest photo
Shred fest photo
The folks behind the 1st Annual Marshall Jack Skate Competition show their enthusiasm. Photo: Michael Sanchez

The Fourth of July weekend is a busy time for most people, but as soon as SLUG knew that the Ute and Ouray tribe out in Fort Duchesne would be holding a skate contest, I jumped at the chance to be in attendance. I had covered this event last year, and I felt more than ready for Round Two. Certified social worker and director at the Alcohol/Substance Abuse Prevention Center Anthony Guzman coordinated the competition in order to get people hyped about other things than getting wasted.

A couple of days before the contest, had Guzman let me know that the Apache Skateboard team would be traveling from Phoenix for the contest. The first time I met Guzman was after I gave a ride to the Apache Skateboard team when they were stranded in Salt Lake en route to Fort Duchesne. Once we made it to Fort Duchesne, Guzman offered me place to sleep. Guzman had breakfast and plenty of conversation for us once we woke up the morning after. Leaving this experience left me with the feeling that I had gained another family. So, hey kids: Give rides to strangers, and you might end up with good feelings and breakfast.

Recently, tribe member Marshall Jack lost his life in a car crash that left two others hospitalized. In memory of a life taken too soon, the skate contest was named the 1st Annual Marshall Jack Skate Competition, which Guzman announced over the speakers before the contest. Guzman and other associates started handing out free T-shirts and water to help keep people hydrated and stay fresh in the summer heat.

Along with the Apache skate team, there were 18 skateboarders in the Marshall Jack Skate Competition, which was a higher turnout than the year before. Things are definitely bigger and better this time around at the contest—$500 in cash money for the skater in First Place, $300 for Second and $200 for Third. If this weren’t enough motivation to enter the contest, product was also given out to places 1–6. The competition had three rounds. After two rounds, the judges would pick the top six to go to the final round where the winner is decided.

As all the pieces fell into place, the final six were as follows: Tommy Hawk, Roscoe Curry, Kade Peters, Tee Noland, Jason Jones and Doug Miles. Hawk and Curry were ranked fifth and sixth and were up first—the winner between these two would face the next top ranked opponent, and so on. Curry was able to sneak his way into third place by busting out a K-grind on the hubba, nollie lipslide on the flat bar and an air out of a quarter pipe that Guzman described as “the taco.” This guy gave his heart out and kept his flow going as he beat out three separate competitors.

Jason Jones came out strong to defend his spot at Second Place. Jones landed a heelflip down the stair set, rock on the taco and a backside 180 off the top of the gutter gap, which secured his place in Second, but he could not beat out Doug Miles. Immediately after his round started, Miles coasted a clean 5-0 on the hubba to a nollie backside heel on the hip of the banks, then cruised to the flat bar for a casual kickflip front board. These tricks were definitely the biggest crowd pleasers. This guy earned the Benjamins in his hand at the end of the contest.

As always, SLUG gives thanks to the Ute Tribe and Anthony Guzman for organizing the Marshall Jack Skate Competition, getting people outdoors and doing something creative—whether it is skateboarding, heavy metal or art.