Review: Iron Reagan

Review: Iron Reagan
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Iron Reagan will initially be recognized for its membership, which counts two members of Municipal Waste and two members of Darkest Hour in its ranks, but this should be eclipsed by their music. … read more

Review: Skiggy Rapz

Review: Skiggy Rapz
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Repeated, perturbing consonant sounds on “Winning Vibes” are the lightest drawbacks on Skiggy Rapz’s latest, Satellites. High-production hip hop often feels like an endless game of lyrical Boggle, where few combinations are possible––Skiggy Rapz is no exception. … read more

Review: John Cale

Review: John Cale
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John Cale
Shifty Adventures in Nookie Wood
Double Six
Street: 10.01.12
John Cale = Bauhaus + The Velvet Underground x Brian Eno
Stand back, kids … at 70, sporting pink dye in his white hair, legend John Cale (The Velvet Underground and too many others to name) is rockin’, and not in a rockin’ chair, son. This album is chockful of his smooth and unmistakable voice––like the voice Jim Morrison might have grown into––his standard drone and his louche lyrics that rival Leonard Cohen’s for their depth. You don’t so much listen to Nookie Woods as you get grabbed and bodily hauled in for some very shifty adventures, indeed. The opener, “I Wanna Talk 2 U,” a collaboration with hip-hop producer Danger Mouse, explodes out of your speakers. The masterful “Hemmingway” rattles you with its building intensity, while “Face to the Sky” is a gorgeous melding of electronic and organic elements, a swooping, woozy nod to Dali’s Car and Bowie. But lest all this ancient name-dropping makes you think the album is a throwback, worry not: there’s nothing old-fashioned about it. Cale seems committed to moving forward with music, playing around with over-processed autotune on “December Rain,” but he’s not afraid of organic acoustic sounds, as on “Mary.” If you don’t already know Cale, it’s time you met him, and a trip to the Nookie Woods is a fine place to start. –Madelyn Boudreaux … read more

Review: St. Lucia

Review: St. Lucia
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Virtual one-man band and Johannesburg native Jean-Philip Grobler’s joyous, self-titled EP is something of a small marvel. Following a relatively simple formula of classic beats, infectious melody and a positive vibe presently missing on most radio these days, he has crafted a group of six tracks that are both pleasant and refreshingly memorable. … read more

 
 
Review: Judy Kang

Review: Judy Kang
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A comparison to Bjork is not the way to my heart; her music is like listening to a fax machine have a nervous breakdown. … read more

Review: Swagatha Christie

Review: Swagatha Christie
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Swagatha is a 20-something blonde who has “swag” tattooed on her knuckles and writes about her white-girl antics. Miss Christie set out on her The Creep Van Tour 2012 last summer, with a stoner/skateboard crew who handed out “Free Sex” stickers at shows. … read more

Review: Lauren Mann & The Fairly Odd Folk

Review: Lauren Mann & The Fairly Odd Folk
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Over Land and Sea starts out with a force that immediately captures your attention. … read more

Reviews: Swingin’ Utters

Reviews: Swingin’ Utters
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What can I say about the Swinging Utters? That they’re an amazing band that always manages to come up with ways to never sound hackneyed or worn-out. That Poorly Formed ranks amongst this fan’s favorite releases from the band’s nearly quarter-century career. … read more

Review: Lonesome Leash

Review: Lonesome Leash
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The first time I attempted to listen to I Am No Captain, I got 30 seconds into the first song before pausing in a frenzy and stowing it away for two weeks.  … read more

Review: Thee Oh Sees

Review: Thee Oh Sees
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hese days, it seems John Dwyer only knows life from within the walls of his abundant pet projects. His dabbling with Thee Oh Sees caused the band to beget 12 albums since 2004—virtually nominating Dwyer as the Nikolai Tesla of contemporary garage/psyche.  … read more