Slamdance Film Review: Bernard and Huey

Slamdance Film Review: Bernard and Huey
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Bernard and Huey is about what happens when two middle-aged men meet 25 years after their young friendship ran its course. It’s a film about men navigating their relationship to sex in the shadow of their own egos, of the confident and put-together women they fuck and, of course, each other … read more

Slamdance Film Review: Sunnyside

Slamdance Film Review: Sunnyside
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Two very eccentric, elderly men who are quasi-neighbors and buddies in Northern California—one a sound-designer, the other an anarcho-architect—go about their business, talking everything and anything with whatever Carbon happened to catch on film. … read more

Slamdance Film Review: Mr. Fish: Cartooning from the Deep End

Slamdance Film Review: Mr. Fish: Cartooning from the Deep End
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The best of art comes from the creation that follows destruction. Mr. Fish: Cartooning From The Deep End is a documentary full of raw, ugly, animated humanity that respects that tension. … read more

Slamdance Film Review: Man on Fire

Slamdance Film Review: Man on Fire
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With information moving at unprecedented speeds and the concept of truth becoming increasingly distorted, definitive and drastic actions speak louder than ever. Such is the case with reverend Charles Moore, the subject of Joel Fendelman’s new documentary. … read more

Slamdance Film Review: Mexman

Slamdance Film Review: Mexman
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Germán Alonso’s main project is Mexman, an idea Alonso first worked on for his senior thesis at USC. It’s a crazy story—one about a Mexican immigrant who comes to America for a better future, who then dies unexpectedly and is subsequently turned into a “cyborg slave.” … read more

Slamdance Film Review: Instant Dreams

Slamdance Film Review: Instant Dreams
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In this visual essay, Baptist mirrors the power of photography, fixating on the Polaroid as not only an artistic medium, but also a decisive technology and cultural document, a record of time that continually develops and evolves with the contemporary world. … read more

Slamdance Film Review: Ingrid

Slamdance Film Review: Ingrid
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After so many years of being an urban creative and mother, Ingrid Gipson traded her life in Texas to pursue a more lonesome one in Oklahoma, where she could surround herself with creative projects and nature, as well as her own independence and creativity. … read more

Slamdance Film Review: Freedom for the Wolf

Slamdance Film Review: Freedom for the Wolf
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Take five countries: Hong Kong, India, Tunisia, Japan and the United States of America. Freedom for the Wolf showcases footage from all of these countries in the last three years, fleshing out each country’s political powers and how each are struggling to achieve their ideal political climate: democracy. … read more

Slamdance Film Review: Circus Ecuador

Slamdance Film Review: Circus Ecuador
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Circus Ecuador Slamdance Film Festival Director: Ashley Bishop and Jim Brassard Non-historical documentaries put so much faith in the unknown. Entering a situation with the hopes that it yields filmable,

Slamdance Film Review: The Starry Sky Above Me

Slamdance Film Review: The Starry Sky Above Me
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The Starry Sky Above Me feels especially off-kilter. It’s not that it’s overtly outlandish or psychedelic, but rather that it sits just on the line between believable and incongruous. A lot of my enjoyment with this film came from its twists and surprises. … read more